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SOSH Running Dogs

Discussion in 'General Sports' started by Catch Me Bruno, May 27, 2007.

  1. MB's Hidden Ball

    MB's Hidden Ball Member SoSH Member

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    1,674
    Sorry to hear that; hope you feel better soon. Injuries/illnesses that make running untenable absolutely suck, particularly when you are feeling ready to go.
     
  2. TallerThanPedroia

    TallerThanPedroia Civilly Disobedient SoSH Member

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    11,099
    I've been doing nothing but eating since I got home Tuesday. I went to see a movie yesterday and got an entire bucket of popcorn. I just weighed 126 on the scale. The lowest I've been as an adult is 128, one time after a long sweaty run. I'm like if you watched Captain America in reverse.
     
  3. SydneySox

    SydneySox A dash of cool to add the heat SoSH Member

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    13,791
    So....

    How was that?
     
  4. GreenMountain

    GreenMountain Well-Known Member Silver Supporter SoSH Member

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    104
    Well the temp was perfect (5 degrees celsius), the torrential rain and screaming headwinds less so. Thanks to the good graces of @pv21feet I was able to spend the pre-race period in the luxurious accommodation of the gym inside instead of in the flooded refugee camp that was the athlete’s village. This was a huge help as I was not hypothermic before starting the race. I went out with the goal of going sub 2:50. I figured that was a very long shot under the conditions, but the race started off well. Felt light on my feet and was able to hold on to a 6:23 pace through mile 16 despite increasing headwinds and intense downbursts. Slowed up somewhat on the hills as expected, but was still close to my target time. The last 6 were tough as I was trying to make back time, but the winds were crazy and it was nearly impossible to make a move out of the pack without getting blown away. Approaching mile 25 I realized I would need to average sub 6:20 for the remainer to beat the 2:50 mark. I pulled off a 6:06 final mile to end up with 2:49:53 on the day. I figure the wind probably cost me about 3-5 minutes over the course of the run, so overall I was very happy with the outcome. Almost froze to death waiting in line for the insanely small single changing tent provided for 30,000 runners, but otherwise a good day.
     
  5. SydneySox

    SydneySox A dash of cool to add the heat SoSH Member

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    13,791
    Dude, well done.

    I can't imagine.
     
  6. southshoresoxfan

    southshoresoxfan Member SoSH Member

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    I can’t picture running one mile at that pace in perfect conditions, let alone 26.2. That’s incredible.
     
  7. CSteinhardt

    CSteinhardt "Steiny" Lifetime Member SoSH Member

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    2,551
    I'm trying to decide whether to try the Copenhagen marathon in about a month and wanted to get a bit of advice. Running isn't the primary thing I do - it's mainly crosstraining for baseball and cricket. So, I'm certainly quite undertrained. I probably average around 5-10 miles per week of dedicated running. However, the cricket training in particular involves a lot of additional running (mostly sprint intervals) and core exercises, and from a cardio point of view, I should definitely be able to complete a marathon. My goal would mainly just be to successfully finish, as I have no illusions of running a respectable time.

    I've done two past marathons on a similar lack of preparation; the first one I decided about three weeks ahead of time to just try one nearby with a lot of downhill in it, and ran a respectable time (3:51) despite doing almost everything wrong with pacing and tactics, but it also took me a while to recover from that one. I decided to run the Copenhagen marathon last year on slightly more preparation; I did a long run each of the 3-4 weeks prior, but the longest was 2.5 hours of running and around 25k. I decided to just go out very slowly to ensure I would finish, ran about a 2:15 first half and was feeling strong at that point, then collided with another running who cut in front of me then slowed down, and about a half hour later ended up cramping up badly enough that I basically had to power walk the rest of the way in and finished in something like 5:10. I don't know whether this was due to the collision changing my running stride or just due to being undertrained.

    I did the Copenhagen half in September, and was on pace to finish in around 1:50 before again cramping up with about 3k to go and basically having to stop for a few minutes. We also had severe thunderstorms, which essentially never happens in Denmark, and there was standing water for the last few km of the course, so that probably didn't help. However, it's surely the case that with more training prior to running, I would have finished.

    This winter was surprisingly cold and snowy for Denmark, and so I did almost no running outside of our cricket preseason. A couple of weeks ago I spent a few days in California and did about 15 miles of hills over a couple of runs, and then on Sunday, I did a local half marathon to see where I was at, with the plan of ignoring the time and trying to run at a fairly low effort just to complete the distance without cramps. I ended up stopping for about 10 seconds every few km during the last half to stretch out my hamstrings, but did end up finishing successfully in 1:59. However, I'm almost certain that I couldn't have done twice the distance.

    So, my question is basically whether going even more slowly is going to help or if there is something I can do in the next 3-4 weeks which will mean I can finish a marathon, or if I just need to accept that it's not going to work this year. Is there a particular exercise that will help with hamstring cramps? Realistically, the most running I can do beyond our current practice schedule would be one long run each weekend. I was thinking that I should do an easy long run this weekend to try and go as far as possible and then another half the weekend after that, then use that to decide whether to sign up. But I'd really appreciate some advice from people who do this as their primary sport, because I really don't know what I'm doing here. I would have a lot of fun running the marathon next month even if it takes me 5 hours or something, as long as I am able to run the full distance. However, walking half the way in front of a large crowd really isn't very enjoyable, so I want to make sure that I'll be able to finish -- at whatever pace -- if I sign up.
     
  8. TallerThanPedroia

    TallerThanPedroia Civilly Disobedient SoSH Member

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    11,099
    Absolutely amazing. One of the things that made watching from my couch bearable was seeing so many people I know not only brave the conditions and finish, but even set big PRs.
     
  9. GreenMountain

    GreenMountain Well-Known Member Silver Supporter SoSH Member

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    104
    Thanks all! It was a wild experience, but pretty cool now that it's over.

    @CSteinhardt aside from under-training (which you seem to have a good handle on) it sounds like you are having problems with hydration, fueling, and electrolyte balance. There are dozens of different ways to approach this problem. Personally on long runs and distance races I carry a water bottle with a hand strap and use Tailwind powder in the water to hydrate and maintain electrolytes. It's similar in concept to gatorade, but much easier to drink and without the massive amount of sugar in gatorade. I also eat a metric ton of rice in the days leading up a marathon. I'm talking a bowl of rice every hour and more if I can manage. Starting on Wednesday before a Sunday race and really ramping up the intake on Friday and Saturday. Eat 2-4 hours before a race, but not closer than that. Take a half-litre or so of your drink of choice (gatorade, tailwind, etc) about 15 min before starting. During the race I drink about every mile or two depending on how I am feeling and the temperature. Hot weather you have to drink more, obviously. For a marathon the hand bottle lasts me about half the race, then I switch to water and Cliff gel packets. For longer distances I can sometimes arrange to refill the bottle and add more Tailwind powder. It's really good stuff. Also, it's hard to substitute for miles and time on feet. You really have to put in the training if you want to avoid injuring yourself on a marathon. I would not run a marathon on a month's notice if I did not have a solid running base built up. Just my 2 cents.
     
  10. SydneySox

    SydneySox A dash of cool to add the heat SoSH Member

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    13,791
    Because I do trails I use a vest (Saloman or UD depending on how I'm feeling) and have a water bottle going with caffienated Tailwind in one and electorytes in the other. Tailwind is better than Gatorade for 1 billion reasons but mostly because it has carbs in it. The only road marathon I did (Sydney) I used the vest.

    However I understand for Boston and other big marathons they're banning/have banned vests as security issues. Not banned here yet, but I suspect that's coming too.

    I hate the handheld water bottles, grip or not, but I also have a belt (https://www.nakedsportsinnovations.com/) which I use in longer ultras for my poles and to attach the race number. I'd use that in the mara for a saloman soft flask.

    Cramps are a strange topic. (Exercise Associated Muscle Cramping) basically have nothing proven at all and there are things that 'work' but no one can prove why and things people take that work for them. Effectively no one can prove why we cramp and no one can prove anything works though different people swear by salt tabs and a mouthful of pickle juice that you spit out. The only thing that is probably true is that it's about tired muscles being asked to do things they can't do anymore; ie under-training and pushing too hard. I've cramped in the last few KM's in all 6 marathon or ultra-marathon races I've done, personally. I'm taking pickle juice on the UTA50 next month to see if I need it.
     
  11. fiskful of dollars

    fiskful of dollars Well-Known Member Gold Supporter SoSH Member

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    I absolutely LOVE Tailwind. Use it for long training days and long course running/tris. I use the non caffeinated version (I pee too much w/ the caffeinated formulation). I can't run w/ anything in my hands - never feels right to me.

    I'm in awe of these Boston stories. Just amazing.
     
  12. SydneySox

    SydneySox A dash of cool to add the heat SoSH Member

    Messages:
    13,791
    I just like the Green Tea flavour, honestly. Though I run with the naked stuff in shorter races. It's funny though with aid stations you turn up and they have the two gallons of liquid, one says 'WATER' the other 'TAILWIND' and I just fill my soft flask with whatever the flavour of Tailwind is and have found none of it really matters. When I finished Tarawera in Feb I think by the end one of my flasks was Raspberry-Green Tea-Tropical-Orange-Lemon Lime flavoured and it tasted fine.

    Have you had any Tailwind: Rebuild? It's a thing that Tailwind is marketing like crazy here atm that's just about to be on sale for the first time. I have been looking for something for post-long runs. I can't drink milk when I've excercised even though milk is amazing, and I don't eat bananas even though they're amazing. T:R sounds pretty cool.
     
  13. CSteinhardt

    CSteinhardt "Steiny" Lifetime Member SoSH Member

    Messages:
    2,551
    Thanks for the advice - a bit of a stupid question as a followup. How do you carry all this stuff when running? Do you carry one of these mini-backpacks? I would have thought that would get really heavy if you're carrying water instead of just using aid stations. I think I'll try a version of this for a long run tomorrow and see how things go.
     
  14. TallerThanPedroia

    TallerThanPedroia Civilly Disobedient SoSH Member

    Messages:
    11,099
  15. SydneySox

    SydneySox A dash of cool to add the heat SoSH Member

    Messages:
    13,791
    Like I said, vests. Saloman, Ultimate Direction, Nathan's and Camelbak make most of them. But in some US marathons they're banned, fyi.

    They're more of a trail thing.

    A lot of road runners use belts.
     
  16. fiskful of dollars

    fiskful of dollars Well-Known Member Gold Supporter SoSH Member

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