Nadia and Nastia’s Nest, 2020 Summer Olympics Gymnastics

SocrManiac

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As for Biles, I have no idea what mental health issue she faced today and I believe her when she says her personal safety and her teammates' chances of success by continuing to compete, but it needs to be clearly communicated to the media and the public what this acute mental health injury is. Any commentary about the sport not being fun anymore more or the physical aches and pains she's feeling as she gets older are going to invite questions about her real reasons for not competing.
Not a huge fan of this take. Biles does not need her personal health disclosed to anybody she does not deem necessary. Despite the evidence she’s put on display at the gym over the past near decade, she is a human being and entitled to keep her private matters private regardless of how famous she is.
 

dirtynine

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Others covered. But they couldn't score as high as marks if Biles had executed perfectly (which she had not done in Tokyo).
Thanks. I'm supportive of her protecting her mental well-being. The team aspect is giving me pause, though. Trying to process how I'd counsel my own daughters to proceed if a team they were a part of was counting on one of them at such a moment. For all I know (and actually, I assume) they were 100% behind her. But she owes me nothing - she's given all of us uncountably more than we deserve.
 

Mystic Merlin

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I think one of the challenges here is that "mental health" is a nebulous phrase that within itself holds multitudes. We have no idea what kind of mental health issue Biles had and no frame of reference we can use to gauge how big of a hurdle this was for her to continue competing and to do so safely. Is it akin to a torn ACL? A sprained ankle? A leg cramp? I think treating all mental health issues as equally severe and beyond reproach is the wrong approach to take, especially because it gives athletes no clear guidance about how they should handle their own issues.

The pressures of being a professional athlete, especially a gold-medal favorite, are undoubtedly huge. These athletes face fears and anxieties that the rest of us can't even begin to understand. I'm sure Katie Ledecky getting silver in the 400m then immediately having to go on TV in front of a global audience and calmly answer inane questions from Michelle Tafoya about when she "knew the tide turned" against her in the race, and I doubt doing so was good for her mental health. That's something any sane person would be afraid of. But is this not something she and her coaches should anticipate and equip her to cope with? Should we not celebrate her mental toughness for doing it? I don't think it's wrong to expect an athlete that benefits so handsomely from her status as one of the best athletes in the world to take proactive steps to protect her mind the same way she would protect her body.

I think it's also important to note that these megastars aren't the only athletes that face mental health issues and that nearly every athlete at the Olympics has a slew of mini-mental health battles. Maybe the stakes aren't quite as high, but they're fighting them all the same.

As for Biles, I have no idea what mental health issue she faced today and I believe her when she says her personal safety and her teammates' chances of success by continuing to compete, but it needs to be clearly communicated to the media and the public what this acute mental health injury is. Any commentary about the sport not being fun anymore more or the physical aches and pains she's feeling as she gets older are going to invite questions about her real reasons for not competing.
What ‘real reasons’? She’s explained her decision, do you want psychiatric consultation notes or medication history, too?
 

jose melendez

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Agree about Biles, don’t agree that a guy wouldn’t take heat.
This is wrong. I don't know about in the Olympic context, but if a male team sport athlete dropped out of the Super Bowl/NBA Finals/World Series saying the pressure was too much, he'd get killed.

If this was the right decision for her good, she should do this for herself, and it's what I'd want my kid to do. But the notion that this isn't a strike against her legacy (whatever that means) is wrong.
 

Kliq

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This is wrong. I don't know about in the Olympic context, but if a male team sport athlete dropped out of the Super Bowl/NBA Finals/World Series saying the pressure was too much, he'd get killed.

If this was the right decision for her good, she should do this for herself, and it's what I'd want my kid to do. But the notion that this isn't a strike against her legacy (whatever that means) is wrong.
Imagine if LeBron dropped out of The Finals because he said the pressure was too much? The discourse would be completely off the rails. I don't think anybody is saying "Nadia Comaneci would never!" on Twitter.

On a more serious note, I do think we celebrate the obsessive mindedness of people like Brady and Jordan, without really thinking that much about how being wired that way can have negative ramifications on their personal lives. Is being that laser-focused and obsessive really a positive trait? Should we think more about preventing athletes, especially young ones that have been in the spotlight since they were teenagers, from being wired like that?

The Olympians, particularly Biles and Ledecky, are put in a really insane position. Not only are they expected to do well, they are expected to completely dominate in a way people have never seen before, and if they stumble even a little, like Ledecky getting silver, its seen as some sort of shocking disappointment. And they really only have a chance to make it happen at that very Olympiad, there is now "Well, there is always next year."
 

cornwalls@6

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You’re absolutely correct that if you don’t want to be on the bad side of this equation you just need to get it done at Olympic Trials. Period.

That said, being a super star shouldn’t give one the moral right to simply hoard start positions to use or not use at will.

And if you’re one spot away, you’ll take that spot - especially if you’re a US female gymnast; You’re a top ten contender. You belong there.

And no, YOU don’t need to care, but I would like to see Simone Biles care, at least a tiny bit…
I honestly can't tell if your posts on this topic are sarcasm. If they're not, good god man. Take a breath and rethink this. Mental illness, and particularly acute episodes of it, are not really very predictable. I'm sure leaving the team competition, and therefore costing a roster spot to someone, was the last thing on her mind heading into this. Someone mentioned it upthread, but this is largely the equivalent of an unforeseen injury. She owes an apology, or an acknowledgement, or whatever you think she needs to do in order to prove that she "cares" to absolutely no one.
 

johnmd20

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Imagine if LeBron dropped out of The Finals because he said the pressure was too much? The discourse would be completely off the rails. I don't think anybody is saying "Nadia Comaneci would never!" on Twitter.
When Lebron had cramps during the 2014 finals, he was murdered, mocked, and derided. It was literally a meme.

If anything, Biles is getting way more support than a man would.
 

Fred not Lynn

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I honestly can't tell if your posts on this topic are sarcasm. If they're not, good god man. Take a breath and rethink this. Mental illness, and particularly acute episodes of it, are not really very predictable. I'm sure leaving the team competition, and therefore costing a roster spot to someone, was the last thing on her mind heading into this. Someone mentioned it upthread, but this is largely the equivalent of an unforeseen injury. She owes an apology, or an acknowledgement, or whatever you think she needs to do in order to prove that she "cares" to absolutely no one.
Remember that the athlete sitting at home isn’t a nameless, faceless stranger to Simone Biles. She’s been a competitor, a team mate, a travel companion and quite likely a friend. The world of high performance sport is a small society, and everyone knows everyone else.

In the world of Olympic sports, few things have more value than a spot on the Olympic Team and a start position at the Olympic Games. To allow either to be wasted has human consequence beyond what the public will ever see or understand. To sit home and watch that spot go wasted knowing you could have been there after all is heartbreaking.

All I am asking is that Simone Biles at least be mindful of that. It would mean a lot to her peer who stayed home.
 

Ralphwiggum

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Remember that the athlete sitting at home isn’t a nameless, faceless stranger to Simone Biles. She’s been a competitor, a team mate, a travel companion and quite likely a friend. The world of high performance sport is a small society, and everyone knows everyone else.

In the world of Olympic sports, few things have more value than a spot on the Olympic Team and a start position at the Olympic Games. To allow either to be wasted has human consequence beyond what the public will ever see or understand. To sit home and watch that spot go wasted knowing you could have been there after all is heartbreaking.

All I am asking is that Simone Biles at least be mindful of that. It would mean a lot to her peer who stayed home.
The word “wasted” in this post is ridiculous. You need to step back from this because your posts in this thread are embarrassing. Would you say her spot was wasted if she broke her ankle in practice before she even competed?
 

djbayko

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The word “wasted” in this post is ridiculous. You need to step back from this because your posts in this thread are embarrassing. Would you say her spot was wasted if she broke her ankle in practice before she even competed?
Right. The posts in this thread saying she owes an apology seem to presume that she did it this all on purpose, which is entirely unknowable but doesn’t seem likely at all. And if that’s not what people are thinking, then I don’t know what the hell she owes an apology for.
 

cornwalls@6

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Remember that the athlete sitting at home isn’t a nameless, faceless stranger to Simone Biles. She’s been a competitor, a team mate, a travel companion and quite likely a friend. The world of high performance sport is a small society, and everyone knows everyone else.

In the world of Olympic sports, few things have more value than a spot on the Olympic Team and a start position at the Olympic Games. To allow either to be wasted has human consequence beyond what the public will ever see or understand. To sit home and watch that spot go wasted knowing you could have been there after all is heartbreaking.

All I am asking is that Simone Biles at least be mindful of that. It would mean a lot to her peer who stayed home.
How do you know she isn't? It's a bad break for that person. It's a worse break for Biles. There is no culprit here. But your posts, even when backpedaling, have a consistent tone of suggesting this was preventable, or that Biles somehow should've known this was going to happen, or somehow wronged a teammate. Based on my first hand experience witnessing loved ones deal with episodes of anxiety and depression, I think that notion is absurd. And does disservice to progress and enlightenment on mental illness.
 
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Pitt the Elder

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This is a horrible take. We know exactly how acute the mental issues were. Enough to make someone mentally tougher than anyone here walk away from her dream. She doesn’t owe us any explanation.
I'm sorry, this is a lazy response. Is this circular logic supposed to be some sort of argument or evidence in and of itself? We're supposed to infer the specific severity of her mental attack because it was enough to make her opt-out of the Olympics as if that's how we judge these things? And please, don't make gross generalizations about how mentally tough anyone is on this forum or elsewhere because we're not an insanely talented athlete.

Not a huge fan of this take. Biles does not need her personal health disclosed to anybody she does not deem necessary. Despite the evidence she’s put on display at the gym over the past near decade, she is a human being and entitled to keep her private matters private regardless of how famous she is.
Fair, she doesn't owe us anything, but as sports fans, we routinely ask our athletes for medical explanations when they're not able to compete and I don't think we give athletes this blanket treatment for injuries or diseases like cancer, torn ligaments, etc. If you want to bring real awareness to mental health, be specific and make the world more aware of what exactly is going on. Handwaving it away with a vague declaration of "mental health issue" and expecting that to satisfy the public and the questions it might have is naive. Maybe the simple answer is we don't know the answer that and we lack that kind of clarity, but I still think it's worth asking the question.

What ‘real reasons’? She’s explained her decision, do you want psychiatric consultation notes or medication history, too?
If your stance is that mental health issues for professional athletes are more sensitive than other health issues and are therefore beyond examination by the public, fine, but that's not going to help anyone understand the problem any better or put situations like this in the proper context. I'm not a psychiatrist and I don't have a good understanding of what potential risks an athlete is taking at the Olympics or any other stage so, yes, an expert psychological explanation would be very helpful to the public and other athletes. Does she owe us this information? Absolutely not, but I think it would be silly not to expect people to ask what exactly happened and hope for answers when they do.

Maybe the answer is that even Biles doesn't know exactly what the issue was. I believe her when she said that there was *something* that affected her mentally that impacted her ability to compete safely. My hope is that we could better understand what exactly this *something* was so that athletes can take steps to manage their own health better AND so that the public can put these kinds of situations into better context.
 

Fred not Lynn

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The word “wasted” in this post is ridiculous. You need to step back from this because your posts in this thread are embarrassing. Would you say her spot was wasted if she broke her ankle in practice before she even competed?
I use “wasted” in a more general way, not specific to this case…but it’s going to be hard for the person at home to get their head around it being anything else. To think to oneself “Wait, I would give anything to be in Tokyo right now, and Simone is pulling out because of what?” isn’t easy.

In the end, Biles owes nothing to anyone, but yes, I personally have empathy for the one at home and understand what might be going through her mind - the rest of you don’t have to, but I do…
 

Ralphwiggum

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How do you know she isn't? It's a bad break for that person. It's a worse break for Biles. There is no culprit here. But your posts, even when backpedaling, have a consistent tone of suggesting this was preventable, or that Biles somehow should've known this was going to happen, or somehow wronged a teammate. Based on my first hand experience witnessing loved ones deal episodes of anxiety and depression, I think that notion is absurd. And does disservice to progress and enlightenment on mental illness.
And the peer didn’t make the team. And nobody would have given Biles credit for removing herself from the games entirely so someone else could have gone. Even if she had a sense that something was off heading into Tokyo, she’s pretty much the most famous Olympian in the world, with an entire TV network‘s coverage and multiple marketing campaigns built around her. The notion that she should have thought about the individual who was the last one cut before the games or should feel guilty or acknowledge that person now is completely ridiculous.
 
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riboflav

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I'm sorry, this is a lazy response. Is this circular logic supposed to be some sort of argument or evidence in and of itself? We're supposed to infer the specific severity of her mental attack because it was enough to make her opt-out of the Olympics as if that's how we judge these things? And please, don't make gross generalizations about how mentally tough anyone is on this forum or elsewhere because we're not an insanely talented athlete.


Fair, she doesn't owe us anything, but as sports fans, we routinely ask our athletes for medical explanations when they're not able to compete and I don't think we give athletes this blanket treatment for injuries or diseases like cancer, torn ligaments, etc. If you want to bring real awareness to mental health, be specific and make the world more aware of what exactly is going on. Handwaving it away with a vague declaration of "mental health issue" and expecting that to satisfy the public and the questions it might have is naive. Maybe the simple answer is we don't know the answer that and we lack that kind of clarity, but I still think it's worth asking the question.


If your stance is that mental health issues for professional athletes are more sensitive than other health issues and are therefore beyond examination by the public, fine, but that's not going to help anyone understand the problem any better or put situations like this in the proper context. I'm not a psychiatrist and I don't have a good understanding of what potential risks an athlete is taking at the Olympics or any other stage so, yes, an expert psychological explanation would be very helpful to the public and other athletes. Does she owe us this information? Absolutely not, but I think it would be silly not to expect people to ask what exactly happened and hope for answers when they do.

Maybe the answer is that even Biles doesn't know exactly what the issue was. I believe her when she said that there was *something* that affected her mentally that impacted her ability to compete safely. My hope is that we could better understand what exactly this *something* was so that athletes can take steps to manage their own health better AND so that the public can put these kinds of situations into better context.

I wasn't a big fan of your original post but I agree with the bolded. It was a gross hyperbolic generalization. I know a member who's read this very thread that had this job on three tours in Vietnam. Biles's thing is sports and fame. Let's not go overboard.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Door_gunner
 

Ralphwiggum

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I use “wasted” in a more general way, not specific to this case…but it’s going to be hard for the person at home to get their head around it being anything else. To think to oneself “Wait, I would give anything to be in Tokyo right now, and Simone is pulling out because of what?” isn’t easy.

In the end, Biles owes nothing to anyone, but yes, I personally have empathy for the one at home and understand what might be going through her mind - the rest of you don’t have to, but I do…
Im sure being the last one cut sucks and I have empathy for anyone who puts that much effort into something and doesn’t get to realize their dreams. But if some dude on the Croatian handball team just sprained an ankle would you spend this much effort worrying about the last person cut from that team? Your posts here imply that Biles should have done something different or should feel guilty about stealing someone elses chance. That’s a shitty take.
 

Pedro's Complaint

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My reaction is compassion for an athlete going through something very difficult in a very public way. I find it hard to believe that Biles would have chosen to compete if she didn't think she could perform at the extraordinary level that made her one of the most celebrated American Olympians in recent memory (on the level of someone like Phelps).

At Sloan in 2019, Silver talked about mental health and his various concerns with players. And that was before the horrors of Covid.

Edit: Fixed link
 

cornwalls@6

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I use “wasted” in a more general way, not specific to this case…but it’s going to be hard for the person at home to get their head around it being anything else. To think to oneself “Wait, I would give anything to be in Tokyo right now, and Simone is pulling out because of what?” isn’t easy.

In the end, Biles owes nothing to anyone, but yes, I personally have empathy for the one at home and understand what might be going through her mind - the rest of you don’t have to, but I do…
And pretty clearly little empathy for Biles. Or the very real issue of mental health. At least you finally showed your real hand.
 

Fred not Lynn

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Your posts here imply that Biles should have done something different or should feel guilty about stealing someone elses chance. That’s a shitty take.
Biles did what she had to do, and I honestly don’t know that there was anything else she COULD do - and maybe “apology” and even “acknowledge” are too-strong acts to expect, but as one of the most famous Olympians of our era “being mindful” of the feelings of her not-famous peers and colleagues who couldn’t be there would go a long way, at least when you view it through my biased eyes.

And it seems to be the verdict here is that this withdrawal completely analogous to a physical injury, and while unpredictable and possibly unavoidable - it still will be perceived by many as something fuzzier, and even if others can rationalize it and understand the nature of what it is, they’re going to manufacture all sorts of not-so-kind conclusions.

I DO get the part where sometimes in sport the pressure puts you in a place where your brain says one thing, and your body decides to do a different thing, or to do nothing at all. Your stomach turns to a brick, and your arms and legs just don’t work like they’re supposed to. Some people call it “The Yips”, others less kindly call it “Choking”, but it is every bit a sport psychology/mental health issue. It’s a shitty feeling, and if there’s an easy remedy I sure don’t know what it is. What happened to Simone Biles might be like this, or maybe it’s something completely different - but the brain is a body part in sport every bit as much as an ankle…except that it’s a lot easier to to get people to understand when you blame a bum ankle for poor performance.
 

Fred not Lynn

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And pretty clearly little empathy for Biles. Or the very real issue of mental health. At least you finally showed your real hand.
I haven’t shown empathy for Biles because I haven’t needed to, everyone else has. I do feel empathy for Biles, she made an incredibly difficult decision that she’s going to get a lot of heat for.

I’ve just chosen to show a little empathy for a person few other people are going to care about, and have concern for what that person is going through, and for that person’s mental health.
 
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Marciano490

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I wasn't a big fan of your original post but I agree with the bolded. It was a gross hyperbolic generalization. I know a member who's read this very thread that had this job on three tours in Vietnam. Biles's thing is sports and fame. Let's not go overboard.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Door_gunner
Nobody is talking about her mental strength because she’s an athlete. She was molested as a child by the team doctor as she tried to represent her country along with many of her closest friends and teammates and then had to continue living and competing with that man responsible for her health,
representing the organization that betrayed her and becoming the best in the world at what she does while being an incredible role model.

All that while having something most people try desperately to keep private broadcast to the whole world.

Without debating how that matches up with military service, I’ll stick by my original assessment.
 

canderson

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Texas Monthly’s Richard Justice (he’s, of former Houston Astors reporting fame) has an excellent essay on Biles that I think is a must read for anyone posting on this thread. Two excerpts:

This is what we owe Simone Biles when she’s back in Texas: the biggest, best welcome-home party of all time.

Let’s wrap our collective arms around the state’s adopted daughter and smother her with an ovation that’ll ring forever in her ears.

In Houston, we know her as more than a great athlete. We know her as a caring member of the community who has used her enormous platform to help others, and who makes every encounter feel like you—whether you’re a fan, a sportswriter, or a young gymnast at her training facility—made her day.
She was the athlete NBC had built its Olympics coverage around, and had she dominated the way she was expected to, the world would have shrugged its shoulders and said, “No biggie.” (She hasn’t ruled out returning Thursday for individual events.)

She was America’s sweetheart after the 2016 Games, where she won three individual gold medals and helped the United States claim gold in team competition. With a red, white, and blue bow in her hair, a wide smile, and an endless reservoir of charm, she made the grueling sport look ridiculously easy.

Then, this week, with the world watching and collectively yawning at her greatness, she faltered once or twice during her team routine. In doing so, she reminded us that even the toughest, smartest, most dedicated athletes in the world are susceptible to pressure.

And when Biles returns home, all of Houston and all of Texas should show her that we appreciate everything she’s accomplished. After the parade and the speeches and all that, she can head over to Minute Maid Park for one of her patented flip pitches that’ll shake the place to its concrete-and-steel bones.
https://www.texasmonthly.com/arts-entertainment/tokyo-olympics-appreciating-simone-biles/?utm_source=Instagram&utm_medium=Social&utm_campaign=Web Social&utm_content=AppreciatingSimoneBiles
 

riboflav

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Nobody is talking about her mental strength because she’s an athlete. She was molested as a child by the team doctor as she tried to represent her country along with many of her closest friends and teammates and then had to continue living and competing with that man responsible for her health,
representing the organization that betrayed her and becoming the best in the world at what she does while being an incredible role model.

All that while having something most people try desperately to keep private broadcast to the whole world.

Without debating how that matches up with military service, I’ll stick by my original assessment.
That's fair, totally.
 

Ale Xander

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I don’t know if this is good or bad or neutral but I’m taking this way harder than I probably should, both from a mental health perspective and from a sports fan perspective. It seems obvious that there are some facts that we don’t know yet and maybe will never know, although selfishly I hope we do learn the whole truth.
I do agree with FnL that if to anyone anything is owed, it’s to either Jade or the next woman up. But not to us.

However unfortunately, I think this will hurt her legacy. There is an argument to be made that the GOAt would have performed today. Brady would have, Jordan would have, Orr would have. Timing on this is bad. This isn’t someone who showed she couldn’t take pressure in the past.

She has a tour coming up, that was supposed to capitalize on this week, with really expensive tickets. I wonder if that’s going to be canceled now. If that still goes on, Ihope she doesn’t get whack jobs to show up to boo her.
 

BaseballJones

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I would hope that everyone realizes that mental toughness comes in all kinds of forms. One of my daughters is a type 1 diabetic (since age 14) and she’s had to be incredibly disciplined to be on top of her blood sugar and everything that comes with it (I can assure you...it’s a LOT) NONSTOP. She can never ever get a break from it. It takes huge mental toughness to deal with this every hour of every day. It’s frigging relentless.

It’s obviously not Olympic sports but it is one hell of a grind and absolutely demoralizing and wearing on a person. This is just one of countless examples we could all cite.

You don’t have to serve in the military or be a world class athlete to have incredible mental toughness. I hope we all understand that.
 

Ale Xander

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You don’t have to serve in the military or be a world class athlete to have incredible mental toughness. I hope we all understand that.
I think the issue at play is the opposite. Fans shouldn’t expect world class athletes to be perfect or to be robots. These are human beings too, with real emotions.
 

Erik Hanson's Hook

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I can't do a backflip, because I'm afraid of the blind spot. I can't imagine what it must be like flying through the air at 20 mph, unsure of yourself. It'd be like driving a racecar, when your hands are shaking.

Also, Covid restrictions suck *ducks...stays ducking*. If her friends and fam were there, the outcome might be different.
 

Ale Xander

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I don’t know why they changes the rule and just have 3 on each apparati. I think if you have say 6 on each and only count 5, like you do for the NCAA’’s, there would be less pressure on each gymnast and it would help the mental health/stress.
 

riboflav

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I would hope that everyone realizes that mental toughness comes in all kinds of forms. One of my daughters is a type 1 diabetic (since age 14) and she’s had to be incredibly disciplined to be on top of her blood sugar and everything that comes with it (I can assure you...it’s a LOT) NONSTOP. She can never ever get a break from it. It takes huge mental toughness to deal with this every hour of every day. It’s frigging relentless.

It’s obviously not Olympic sports but it is one hell of a grind and absolutely demoralizing and wearing on a person. This is just one of countless examples we could all cite.

You don’t have to serve in the military or be a world class athlete to have incredible mental toughness. I hope we all understand that.
Obviously, my point wasn't that a gunner who has one of the most stressful jobs in the history of humanity has cornered the market on mental toughness. It's just that we cannot assume that someone, in this case Biles, has more mental toughness than any SoSHer. It's really hard to compare.
 

Ale Xander

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“I don’t want to do something stupid”
This is heartbreaking
I didn’t know she attempted when I heard the “news” , didn’t want to get spoiled any further

just heartbreaking
 

canderson

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Oof. Feel terrible for her. You can practically see the panic on her face in the air off the table and the anxiety on the sidelines.
Came to post the same. You can see the …. fear is the wrong word but that’s the only one that comes to mind … clearly in her face. It’s painful to watch, I can’t even fathom what’s shes going through and doing so virtually alone.
 

BaseballJones

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Obviously, my point wasn't that a gunner who has one of the most stressful jobs in the history of humanity has cornered the market on mental toughness. It's just that we cannot assume that someone, in this case Biles, has more mental toughness than any SoSHer. It's really hard to compare.
Yes I totally agree.
 

BaseballJones

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Oct 1, 2015
14,711
I can't do a backflip, because I'm afraid of the blind spot. I can't imagine what it must be like flying through the air at 20 mph, unsure of yourself. It'd be like driving a racecar, when your hands are shaking.
It's one thing that separates the greatest in the world from the rest. Obviously she's a superior athlete. But she also tries maneuvers that take a TON of nerve because, frankly, they're dangerous. Consider Franz Klammer's famous 1976 Olympic downhill run. The ONLY chance he had was to ski at the very edge of control (or the edge of losing control, as it were). He was flying down the hill at 65+ miles an hour on the verge of total catastrophe. But he had the nerve and the skill to pull it off. Some people have the nerve but not the skill. Others have the skill but not the nerve. Klammer had both, and he won the gold. Nobody else has the skill to do the things that Biles can do, but Biles can only do it if she has the requisite nerve.

And obviously she lost that nerve.
 

BaseballJones

ivanvamp
SoSH Member
Oct 1, 2015
14,711
And props to your daughter and I hope she's safe and thrives. I'd like to think that I'd be as disciplined as her especially as someone three times her age but I'm really not sure I would.
Thanks, I appreciate that. She does a good job but the disease really is relentless. And her life is literally on the line day after day. At times she seems like she just wants to give up and give in to it but she has, thus far, always come through.
 

joe dokes

Member
SoSH Member
Jul 18, 2005
22,070
Oof. Feel terrible for her. You can practically see the panic on her face in the air off the table and the anxiety on the sidelines.
This.

And this.
“I don’t want to do something stupid”
This is heartbreaking
I didn’t know she attempted when I heard the “news” , didn’t want to get spoiled any further

just heartbreaking

Some of the criticisms here sound about as cruel and uninformed as some of the Covid truthers.
 

Ale Xander

killed off Vin Scully
SoSH Member
Oct 31, 2013
43,356
After seeing her tell her teammates that she loves them and to "kick ass," I will punch anyone in the face who I hear IRL say she's a bad teammate or anything similar.
 

riboflav

Member
SoSH Member
Jan 20, 2006
8,246
NOVA
Thanks, I appreciate that. She does a good job but the disease really is relentless. And her life is literally on the line day after day. At times she seems like she just wants to give up and give in to it but she has, thus far, always come through.
I'm sorry to hear that and I really wish her the best. Good luck, BJ!
 

tims4wins

PN23's replacement
SoSH Member
Jul 15, 2005
28,723
Hingham, MA
How do you know she isn't? It's a bad break for that person. It's a worse break for Biles. There is no culprit here. But your posts, even when backpedaling, have a consistent tone of suggesting this was preventable, or that Biles somehow should've known this was going to happen, or somehow wronged a teammate. Based on my first hand experience witnessing loved ones deal with episodes of anxiety and depression, I think that notion is absurd. And does disservice to progress and enlightenment on mental illness.
But based on some of her prior comments, it seems as if she DID see this coming, at least in the back of her head. That’s where the potential problem lies.
 

BaseballJones

ivanvamp
SoSH Member
Oct 1, 2015
14,711
I'm sorry to hear that and I really wish her the best. Good luck, BJ!
Thanks. It's a lifelong thing for the whole family. It's her cross to bear but we're all in as a family. Someday I'm hoping for a cure but I'm not THAT optimistic about it. It's an autoimmune disease that really is pretty rough. I do hope that some day they'll have an artificial pancreas that will really make managing this MUCH easier. But it's not here yet.

Anyway, to the point: mental toughness exists in a whole lot of people for a whole lot of reasons. My daughter may have diabetes but others here have their own issues that they're toughing out.
 

Mystic Merlin

Member
SoSH Member
Sep 21, 2007
38,159
Hartford, CT
But based on some of her prior comments, it seems as if she DID see this coming, at least in the back of her head. That’s where the potential problem lies.
Let’s second guess the 24 year old dealing with incredible pressure and scrutiny to carry the US Olympic brand, not just the gymnastics team, in the last year of her career as a viable gymnast while dealing with mental health issues. She should’ve known precisely when to shut it down, after all who doesn’t? Potential problem, guys, read all about it!
 

Fred not Lynn

Dick Button Jr.
SoSH Member
Jul 13, 2005
4,993
Alberta
I think the issue at play is the opposite. Fans shouldn’t expect world class athletes to be perfect or to be robots. These are human beings too, with real emotions.
Believe me, being a world class athlete is no guarantee that you’re at all mentally tough. There are plenty of Olympic athletes are the whiniest, self-interested, entitled people you’re ever going to meet, others seem mentally tough, but they’re just kind of simple folk with brains that don’t think deep enough to be fazed by what’s going on around them…and others, do have incredible mental toughness not just on race day, but every other day preparing.

In the end, they’re just an ordinary cross section of humanity, with somewhat interesting vocations…
 
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Kremlin Watcher

Member
SoSH Member
Sep 20, 2005
4,555
Houston, TX
Wow. The contrast between her emotional state after she dropped out and right before and after that vault is amazing. She was having a massive anxiety episode; made the decision, and the weight was lifted off her shoulders. Hope she finds a path to relieving that anxiety issue. So hard to shoulder that burden, especially at that age and on that stage.
 

tims4wins

PN23's replacement
SoSH Member
Jul 15, 2005
28,723
Hingham, MA
Let’s second guess the 24 year old dealing with incredible pressure and scrutiny to carry the US Olympic brand, not just the gymnastics team, in the last year of her career as a viable gymnast while dealing with mental health issues. She should’ve known precisely when to shut it down, after all who doesn’t? Potential problem, guys, read all about it!
Again, as I said on page 1 of the thread, I’m not going to crucify her for this. But based on everything we know this was building for some time. She was courageous for dropping out. It would have been even more courageous - and admittedly difficult - to drop out prior. I don’t blame her for her decisions. I wish they were different.