SBLII: Patriots Injury News

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RedOctober3829

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deep inside Guido territory

On Patriots LB Kyle Van Noy's leg injury, a source told me it's not thought to be a long-term concern.


Kyle Van Noy suffered a minor calf injury yesterday, per source. Too early to know if he’ll be ready for Sunday, but the absence isn’t expected to linger beyond that if he does have to sit out.
 
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streeter88

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Nate Ebner on IR as well as Bennett, per Globe Jim McBride.


"League source also confirms #Patriots safety Nate Ebner will be placed on IR after suffering knee injury vs. Dolphins. Was having another All-Pro caliber season."
 

AB in DC

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Apologies for game threading, but you'd think that a rugby guy like Ebner would know how to get tackled without blowing out his knee.
 

DJnVa

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5dice

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Tough about Ebner, sad about Marty, concerned about Flowers. That said, it is just part of another Patriots story and next man up. Hogan and Cannon back for Pittsburgh is my hope. My sense is nobody is getting pressed into unnecessary service for next two games.
 

Saints Rest

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Ebner's loss could be mitigated by the return of Slater. Sad that the first time we see Ebner put the ball-carrying part of rugby to use on the football field, he blows out his knee. (I see that with a home game, Slater was back, albeit in street clothes for his weekly, "How do we feel about being 9-2" speech, but I meant to ask Who filled in for Slater in that role last week in Mexico? It was clearly an homage to #18, but I didn't recognize him. It was a white guy with a beard; Ebner maybe?)

Cannon's return is pretty important with Waddle going down. I'm not too happy about Fleming at RT.
 

timelysarcasm

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Apologies for game threading, but you'd think that a rugby guy like Ebner would know how to get tackled without blowing out his knee.
The apologies should have been for:

1) Not knowing that the injury was non-contact
2) Thinking rugby skills include avoiding injury while being tackled
3) Thinking we'd think the same dumbassery as you

Flowers ribs aren't broken, per Howe and others. Hopefully it's short term because depth there is pretty lacking.

 

Bowhemian

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Apologies for game threading, but you'd think that a rugby guy like Ebner would know how to get tackled without blowing out his knee.
Part of this has been covered already, but his knee injury appeared to be a non-contact injury. If you watch the replay, his knee buckles as he is trying to make a cut, before he was tackled.
 

E5 Yaz

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Ebner's loss could be mitigated by the return of Slater. Sad that the first time we see Ebner put the ball-carrying part of rugby to use on the football field, he blows out his knee. (I see that with a home game, Slater was back, albeit in street clothes for his weekly, "How do we feel about being 9-2" speech, but I meant to ask Who filled in for Slater in that role last week in Mexico? It was clearly an homage to #18, but I didn't recognize him. It was a white guy with a beard; Ebner maybe?).
Ebner had two kick returns in 2015.

More importantly, Slater isn't likely to make up for any part of the loss of Ebner. They play entirely different roles on special teams.
 

deythur

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Ebner's loss could be mitigated by the return of Slater. Sad that the first time we see Ebner put the ball-carrying part of rugby to use on the football field, he blows out his knee. (I see that with a home game, Slater was back, albeit in street clothes for his weekly, "How do we feel about being 9-2" speech, but I meant to ask Who filled in for Slater in that role last week in Mexico? It was clearly an homage to #18, but I didn't recognize him. It was a white guy with a beard; Ebner maybe?)

Cannon's return is pretty important with Waddle going down. I'm not too happy about Fleming at RT.
Pretty sure it was Amendola filling in for Slater in Mexico
 

bakahump

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Luckily BB and Co really seemed like they stockpiled some good Special teamers to add to the Slater, Bolden and Ebner Show of the last few years. (Ex:Bademosi, Reilly until he turned himself into a human cannoball). ST is probably one of the deepest parts of the team in regards to surviving an injury. I also have alot of faith that a(ny) Practice Squad Caliber athlete will be coached up by the Pats Staff to sufficiently cover the 8-10 Special teams plays a game. Except for Return men. :)

JJones also is someone who has embraced the ST game and made alot of positive plays.
 

bakahump

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Injury Gods certainly are not making life easy

Conservatively 5 Starters. and all 9 real contributors.

Pats IR

Bennett, Martellus

TE
6-6
275
30
10
Texas A&M
43
Ebner, Nate
DB
6-0
220
28
6
Ohio State
11
Edelman, Julian
WR
5-10
200
31
9
Kent State
54
Hightower, Dont'a
LB
6-3
265
27
6
Alabama
41
Jones, Cyrus
CB
5-10
200
23
2
Alabama
58
McClellin, Shea
LB
6-3
250
28
6
Boise State
19
Mitchell, Malcolm
WR
6-1
200
25
2
Georgia
95
Rivers, Derek
DE
6-5
250
23
R
Youngstown State
99
Valentine, Vincent
DT
6-3
320
23
2
Nebraska
#

 

Reverend

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Luckily BB and Co really seemed like they stockpiled some good Special teamers to add to the Slater, Bolden and Ebner Show of the last few years. (Ex:Bademosi, Reilly until he turned himself into a human cannoball). ST is probably one of the deepest parts of the team in regards to surviving an injury. I also have alot of faith that a(ny) Practice Squad Caliber athlete will be coached up by the Pats Staff to sufficiently cover the 8-10 Special teams plays a game. Except for Return men. :)

JJones also is someone who has embraced the ST game and made alot of positive plays.
A side effect of having so many key players alsonplaybsoecial teams, especially when they’re young, means more guys who are able to fill in in a pinch.
 

DennyDoyle'sBoil

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I think Rev may have had a seizure. Are you still with us here, Rev?

Both on Dale and Holley and on the reporter's conference call yesterday they asked BB a lot of questions about depth on special teams, and it was really good stuff. Both are on Patriots.com under "audio" if anyone is interested.
 

tims4wins

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I think Rev may have had a seizure. Are you still with us here, Rev?

Both on Dale and Holley and on the reporter's conference call yesterday they asked BB a lot of questions about depth on special teams, and it was really good stuff. Both are on Patriots.com under "audio" if anyone is interested.
Q: You talked yesterday about the challenge of replacing players that are injured, in particular on the kicking team. Do you have to create a depth chart at all of the positions on special teams, similar to offense and defense? How challenging is that?

BB: Sure, absolutely. Yeah, you create depth charts all the time. You know, it's interesting when you have a full roster, like in the spring or in training camp. When you have those special team meetings, sometimes your depth chart is five or six guys deep and the guy who's sixth on the depth chart sometimes will say, really, ‘Why am I here? Do I really need to be at this meeting or spend time on this? I'm sixth on the depth chart.' But, as you know, once that 90 becomes 53 and then eventually 46, literally everybody that's on the active roster for a game is probably going to be on that depth chart, excluding, of course, the quarterbacks, the specialists have their role and the offensive linemen and many of the defensive linemen, other than field goal and field goal rush. So, that cuts down your numbers quite a bit. If you eliminate a couple of other players that maybe have significant roles on offense or defense that really aren't a big part of the special teams unit - maybe they have one special role, like the hands team or something like that, which is important but not a high-frequency play - again, your numbers get cut pretty thin. So, maybe you're working with a total of - I don't know - 18, 19, 20 players, basically, for those 66 spots, or at least 44 spots, if you eliminate field goal and field goal rush. So, that's a lot of depth provided by the same guys. Again, in some cases, you have to move one guy for a spot and then somebody else replaces him, so it's not just I come in for you, but then you move over and take the spot of the person that we need to replace. So, look, every NFL team has the same situation. It's no different for us than it is for the other 31 teams, but having coached special teams for a number of years and having also coached offense and defense and understanding that when a player goes home at night - a lot of players, I should say, aren't just responsible for their plays on offense or defense or special teams. They're responsible for two of those three things. So, offensive skill players not only have to prepare for the offensive plays, but they're also preparing for plays in the kicking game, and the same thing defensively. Or, guys that are in special teams who have a primary role in the kicking game - like earlier in the year, let's just say, with a player like [Johnson] Bademosi - have to be ready to go on all the defensive units, as well. So, that's just being professional, being prepared, doing your job. But, it's a little bit like a relief pitcher in baseball. You go to the stadium and you don't know if you have to pitch or not. Well, sometimes certain players on the football team have a similar role that they don't know whether they're really going to have to perform that role or not. You have to be ready to go if you're called on, but that may not be the case. Again, each one of us on the team - every coach, every player, regardless of what our role is - we all have a job to do. Nobody can really do it for us. We all have to prepare and do the things that we need to do to be ready to perform that job when it's needed on game day in critical situations. So, that's what being a professional and that's what being a good teammate and that's what having a good team is all about is everybody doing that.
 

The Needler

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Because rugby players don’t get hurt?
"Ma'am, I'm from the war department. I'm sorry to tell you your husband is dead. You would think a soldier would know how not to get shot."
As an orthopedic surgeon and a former rugby player... just no.
The apologies should have been for:

1) Not knowing that the injury was non-contact
2) Thinking rugby skills include avoiding injury while being tackled
3) Thinking we'd think the same dumbassery as you

Flowers ribs aren't broken, per Howe and others. Hopefully it's short term because depth there is pretty lacking.

Part of this has been covered already, but his knee injury appeared to be a non-contact injury. If you watch the replay, his knee buckles as he is trying to make a cut, before he was tackled.
He knew what he was signing up for
They call this a scrum, right?
 

DennyDoyle'sBoil

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Q: You talked yesterday about the challenge of replacing players that are injured, in particular on the kicking team. Do you have to create a depth chart at all of the positions on special teams, similar to offense and defense? How challenging is that?

BB: Sure, absolutely. Yeah, you create depth charts all the time. You know, it's interesting when you have a full roster, like in the spring or in training camp. When you have those special team meetings, sometimes your depth chart is five or six guys deep and the guy who's sixth on the depth chart sometimes will say, really, ‘Why am I here? Do I really need to be at this meeting or spend time on this? I'm sixth on the depth chart.' But, as you know, once that 90 becomes 53 and then eventually 46, literally everybody that's on the active roster for a game is probably going to be on that depth chart, excluding, of course, the quarterbacks, the specialists have their role and the offensive linemen and many of the defensive linemen, other than field goal and field goal rush. So, that cuts down your numbers quite a bit. If you eliminate a couple of other players that maybe have significant roles on offense or defense that really aren't a big part of the special teams unit - maybe they have one special role, like the hands team or something like that, which is important but not a high-frequency play - again, your numbers get cut pretty thin. So, maybe you're working with a total of - I don't know - 18, 19, 20 players, basically, for those 66 spots, or at least 44 spots, if you eliminate field goal and field goal rush. So, that's a lot of depth provided by the same guys. Again, in some cases, you have to move one guy for a spot and then somebody else replaces him, so it's not just I come in for you, but then you move over and take the spot of the person that we need to replace. So, look, every NFL team has the same situation. It's no different for us than it is for the other 31 teams, but having coached special teams for a number of years and having also coached offense and defense and understanding that when a player goes home at night - a lot of players, I should say, aren't just responsible for their plays on offense or defense or special teams. They're responsible for two of those three things. So, offensive skill players not only have to prepare for the offensive plays, but they're also preparing for plays in the kicking game, and the same thing defensively. Or, guys that are in special teams who have a primary role in the kicking game - like earlier in the year, let's just say, with a player like [Johnson] Bademosi - have to be ready to go on all the defensive units, as well. So, that's just being professional, being prepared, doing your job. But, it's a little bit like a relief pitcher in baseball. You go to the stadium and you don't know if you have to pitch or not. Well, sometimes certain players on the football team have a similar role that they don't know whether they're really going to have to perform that role or not. You have to be ready to go if you're called on, but that may not be the case. Again, each one of us on the team - every coach, every player, regardless of what our role is - we all have a job to do. Nobody can really do it for us. We all have to prepare and do the things that we need to do to be ready to perform that job when it's needed on game day in critical situations. So, that's what being a professional and that's what being a good teammate and that's what having a good team is all about is everybody doing that.
Yup -- that's what I was thinking of.

Press conferences and other stuff with Belichick have really evolved and are so much better this year. They seem to know the ground rules now. And he's responding. There are always one or two that try to be provocative. But even with the question after the game about taking players out so they don't get injured, even though BB reacted with annoyance, you could almost see him catch himself and he added something about "we just don't see it the same," and turned it into a quasi-substantive answer about counting the number of possessions that he thought the other team might still have. You almost get the sense this year, and a bit last year too, that he actually wants to answer some of the questions and isn't quite so annoyed -- so long as they are the right questions -- and so long as the team won that week.
 

Al Zarilla

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Q: You talked yesterday about the challenge of replacing players that are injured, in particular on the kicking team. Do you have to create a depth chart at all of the positions on special teams, similar to offense and defense? How challenging is that?

BB: Sure, absolutely. Yeah, you create depth charts all the time. You know, it's interesting when you have a full roster, like in the spring or in training camp. When you have those special team meetings, sometimes your depth chart is five or six guys deep and the guy who's sixth on the depth chart sometimes will say, really, ‘Why am I here? Do I really need to be at this meeting or spend time on this? I'm sixth on the depth chart.' But, as you know, once that 90 becomes 53 and then eventually 46, literally everybody that's on the active roster for a game is probably going to be on that depth chart, excluding, of course, the quarterbacks, the specialists have their role and the offensive linemen and many of the defensive linemen, other than field goal and field goal rush. So, that cuts down your numbers quite a bit. If you eliminate a couple of other players that maybe have significant roles on offense or defense that really aren't a big part of the special teams unit - maybe they have one special role, like the hands team or something like that, which is important but not a high-frequency play - again, your numbers get cut pretty thin. So, maybe you're working with a total of - I don't know - 18, 19, 20 players, basically, for those 66 spots, or at least 44 spots, if you eliminate field goal and field goal rush. So, that's a lot of depth provided by the same guys. Again, in some cases, you have to move one guy for a spot and then somebody else replaces him, so it's not just I come in for you, but then you move over and take the spot of the person that we need to replace. So, look, every NFL team has the same situation. It's no different for us than it is for the other 31 teams, but having coached special teams for a number of years and having also coached offense and defense and understanding that when a player goes home at night - a lot of players, I should say, aren't just responsible for their plays on offense or defense or special teams. They're responsible for two of those three things. So, offensive skill players not only have to prepare for the offensive plays, but they're also preparing for plays in the kicking game, and the same thing defensively. Or, guys that are in special teams who have a primary role in the kicking game - like earlier in the year, let's just say, with a player like [Johnson] Bademosi - have to be ready to go on all the defensive units, as well. So, that's just being professional, being prepared, doing your job. But, it's a little bit like a relief pitcher in baseball. You go to the stadium and you don't know if you have to pitch or not. Well, sometimes certain players on the football team have a similar role that they don't know whether they're really going to have to perform that role or not. You have to be ready to go if you're called on, but that may not be the case. Again, each one of us on the team - every coach, every player, regardless of what our role is - we all have a job to do. Nobody can really do it for us. We all have to prepare and do the things that we need to do to be ready to perform that job when it's needed on game day in critical situations. So, that's what being a professional and that's what being a good teammate and that's what having a good team is all about is everybody doing that.
The guy is so incredibly freaking thorough in everything about his job. He has to love it. He said he won't be Marv Levy. Marv coached his last year at 72 (thought it was older). Bill is 65 now. Think about it and be a Marv, Bill, or close to it, please. I mean, 1997's 72 is today's 66, or something.:)
 

joe dokes

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The guy is so incredibly freaking thorough in everything about his job. He has to love it. He said he won't be Marv Levy. Marv coached his last year at 72 (thought it was older). Bill is 65 now. Think about it and be a Marv, Bill, or close to it, please. I mean, 1997's 72 is today's 66, or something.:)

On one hand, it's obvious stuff. But on the other, while I'm consciously aware that the offense and defense need 11, plus situational subs and in-game injury depth, it's never really occurred to me with the same obviousness that there are 44 (or 66) ST spots to fill.
 

Harry Hooper

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Yup -- that's what I was thinking of.

even though BB reacted with annoyance, you could almost see him catch himself and he added something about "we just don't see it the same," and turned it into a quasi-substantive answer about counting the number of possessions that he thought the other team might still have.
I was thinking the same thing: a snippy start to his answer but then he changed tone significantly.
 

Reverend

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Q: You talked yesterday about the challenge of replacing players that are injured, in particular on the kicking team. Do you have to create a depth chart at all of the positions on special teams, similar to offense and defense? How challenging is that?

BB: Sure, absolutely. Yeah, you create depth charts all the time. You know, it's interesting when you have a full roster, like in the spring or in training camp. When you have those special team meetings, sometimes your depth chart is five or six guys deep and the guy who's sixth on the depth chart sometimes will say, really, ‘Why am I here? Do I really need to be at this meeting or spend time on this? I'm sixth on the depth chart.' But, as you know, once that 90 becomes 53 and then eventually 46, literally everybody that's on the active roster for a game is probably going to be on that depth chart, excluding, of course, the quarterbacks, the specialists have their role and the offensive linemen and many of the defensive linemen, other than field goal and field goal rush. So, that cuts down your numbers quite a bit. If you eliminate a couple of other players that maybe have significant roles on offense or defense that really aren't a big part of the special teams unit - maybe they have one special role, like the hands team or something like that, which is important but not a high-frequency play - again, your numbers get cut pretty thin. So, maybe you're working with a total of - I don't know - 18, 19, 20 players, basically, for those 66 spots, or at least 44 spots, if you eliminate field goal and field goal rush. So, that's a lot of depth provided by the same guys. Again, in some cases, you have to move one guy for a spot and then somebody else replaces him, so it's not just I come in for you, but then you move over and take the spot of the person that we need to replace. So, look, every NFL team has the same situation. It's no different for us than it is for the other 31 teams, but having coached special teams for a number of years and having also coached offense and defense and understanding that when a player goes home at night - a lot of players, I should say, aren't just responsible for their plays on offense or defense or special teams. They're responsible for two of those three things. So, offensive skill players not only have to prepare for the offensive plays, but they're also preparing for plays in the kicking game, and the same thing defensively. Or, guys that are in special teams who have a primary role in the kicking game - like earlier in the year, let's just say, with a player like [Johnson] Bademosi - have to be ready to go on all the defensive units, as well. So, that's just being professional, being prepared, doing your job. But, it's a little bit like a relief pitcher in baseball. You go to the stadium and you don't know if you have to pitch or not. Well, sometimes certain players on the football team have a similar role that they don't know whether they're really going to have to perform that role or not. You have to be ready to go if you're called on, but that may not be the case. Again, each one of us on the team - every coach, every player, regardless of what our role is - we all have a job to do. Nobody can really do it for us. We all have to prepare and do the things that we need to do to be ready to perform that job when it's needed on game day in critical situations. So, that's what being a professional and that's what being a good teammate and that's what having a good team is all about is everybody doing that.
What he said.
 

pedroia'sboys

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Sorry if this has been awnsered. Is the rule two of McClellin, Mitchell, Valentine can return. McClellin was about to return until i believe a concussion set him back. Haven't heard any news on him since, can he still return?
 

lexrageorge

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Only one of Valentine or Mitchell can be activated this season. It's looking less and less likely either one will, however.
 
Jan 30, 2017
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While injuries have been mounting for the Tom's the Bills have severe injuries. I was waaaay off against the Broncos, but based on roster health I expect the Pats to fail in covering the 10 point spread of respect they were given.

NB: I'm a terrible gambler.
 

rslm

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I would also think Freeny being released would be a clue that Kyle Van Noy will play vs. Steelers.
 

Dr. Gonzo

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How did Fleming look on Monday to people who have a better eye at evaluating offensive line play? It seemed most of the pressure was from the interior line and receivers not getting separation.
 
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