SOSH Running Dogs

WinRemmerswaal

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Feb 21, 2002
282
Has anyone run in Newtons? Two of the guys in my running circle have switched to Newtons and are encouraging me to try them. Any thoughts?

http://www.newtonrunning.com/
Would love to jump off of this to get some more general suggestions on shoes. I've always gone to New Balance since they have the outlet here in Allston and their shoes run wide - I need EE and have an especially wide forefoot/toe box. My current running shoes are NB840, have gone through a few pairs, have 400+ miles on this pair. I would be interested in something lighter but would not go too minimal since I run in the early morning so am usually in the dark and would be worried about stones/rough spots/etc.

I know some of the folks in this thread are very well informed, would welcome input. Alternatively, does anyone have a local running store where they have gotten especially good input about shoes?
Thanks
 

bgo544

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Nov 25, 2003
672
East Bay
Like you, I wear EE, and have found that the options are fairly limited for wide sizes, especially if you are looking to go more lightweight. I have found that most manufacturers have only a couple (at most) lines of shoes that come in wide sizes, and they tend to be the more traditional heavier, cushioned kind of shoe. New Balance is the exception - most of their shoes, including the Minimus line, come in wides.

I really like the NB890, which is quite lightweight, but still cushioned enough for my 180lbs. I use a pair of extra-cushy Asics Cumulus for longer runs (>8mi).

You might also consider some of the NB Minimus trail runners, which I assume would have more foot protection than the minimalist road shoes. I just ordered a pair, but don't have them yet so I can't tell you too much about them.
 

Kremlin Watcher

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Sep 20, 2005
4,243
Houston, TX
Let me preface this by noting that I don't wear running shoes when I run, but I do coach people who do, so here's the advice I give to them:

1) Go to a speciality running store like Marathon Sports in Boston (or Google "specialty running store" to find one). Olympia Sports is not a specialty running store. Perhaps even call them in advance to make sure you can talk directly to a running shoe expert. Geeks who sell specialty equipment love this and can be very helpful.
2) The most important things (IMO) about running shoes are:
- fit in relation to your unique anatomical qualities (pronation, supination, relative joint strength, any issues with your plantar fascia, bone spurs, etc.);
- overall comfort (this will be a function of the above point);
- weight (lighter is almost always better); and
- protection.
Note that I don't think padding is super-important. You should run as comfortably as you can, but no amount of padding is going to prevent injury if your shoes don't fit your anatomy.
3) Working with the running store person, find a shoe that gives you as flat a foot strike as possible. Landing on the inside or outside part of your foot is one of the most common causes of running injuries. If you have really wide feet, one brand may not work for you because it runs narrow and forces your foot into an unnatural position, for example. Keep trying brands and models until you are certain that you are comfortable and landing evenly.
4) Your ideal running shoe should have as little "drop" as practical for you. Drop is the distance from the highest point of the footbed (at the heel) to the lowest (forefoot). The less drop you have, the more comfortable your gait should be. Doesn't need to be no drop, but generally speaking, the less drop the better.
5) Focus on being comfortable rather than buying into a specific brand. One of the reasons there are so many different kinds of running shoes is that we are all just a little bit different anatomically, so what works for me (barefoot) may not work for you. So it is unwise to recommend a specific brand or model of shoe without trying them out, which is why you should go to a specialist running store and talk with a specialist running shoe person. If you currently experience discomfort running, you might be amazed at the difference the right shoe makes.

So yes, Newton make great shoes. I know people who swear by them. But I also know people who have bought them, run a couple of times in them, then gotten rid of them.

Hope this is useful.
 

WinRemmerswaal

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Feb 21, 2002
282
KW, that is really helpful, thanks. There's a Marathon not too far from me, so I will give them a try. Do you think they will get helpful information from looking at wear patterns on my running shoes? I have a few pairs with 400-500 miles on them.

Do you run barefoot even in the winter? I get Raynaud's in my fingers and use 2 and sometimes 3 layers of gloves in the cold. Feet have been OK with sturdy socks and the NB shoes I wear, but I get apprehensive about less insulation with lighter shoes.
 

Kremlin Watcher

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Sep 20, 2005
4,243
Houston, TX
Yes, definitely bring in your worn shoes. The strike pattern will make it clear if you have pronation or supination issues.

In winter I run in Vibram Five Fingers. I only run on the road, so as long as I keep moving my feet don't feel the cold too much. I lived in Russia for so long that I don't really notice the cold anymore.
 

WinRemmerswaal

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Feb 21, 2002
282
The people at Marathon were helpful. We ended up sticking with the same NB840 shoes that I have been using given how wide my foot and especially toe box are, most of the others pinched. I give them credit for being honest, I had told them I get these shoes at the factory outlet and they definitely could have tried to convince me to try a pair other than NBs so that they could make the sale, but they said the NBs were best, so might as well head back to the outlet. Looked at a couple of the more minimalist shoes, but they seemed concerned about how I would adapt to those with both my foot width and stride.

Felt like if I didn't buy anything I should at least give them a free plug here.
 

SoxinPA

lurker
Aug 8, 2008
71
Central PA
Training question here...
I've been a runner for the last 17 years, at some times more seriously than others, but I've finally gotten some resolve to train for a marathon now that I've turned thirty. I'm in good shape generally, about 150 lbs, and have always been lucky to avoid the normal running-associated physical pitfalls (no stress fractures, plantar fasciitis) and as such have bought into minimallist, but very little barefoot) running. I've also had some issues with hip flexors/groin in the past.
My question is, can anyone direct me to a source for good foot-strengthening exercises to help to improve the transition to minimalist running? I really do not want anything to go wrong in this because I'm not sure when I'll again have the motivation/opportunity to really train for a marathon and I do not want to see it derailed by foot injury. Also, if anyone is aware of good stretches or strengthening exercises to help with the hip flexor/groin issues, I would be eternally grateful. Thanks!
 

dixielandbandana

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Jul 15, 2005
229
Iowa City/Boston/Michigan
Does anyone have any advice/info on the Disney princess half-marathon? I got into running (jogging) about 10 months ago, and it seemed like a good first distance race. I ran a 15K back in October, which went fine, albeit a little slower than I'd planned. My dad ran Boston 7 times, so it would be amazing to work up to that some day, but I'm ok with baby steps for now!
I've heard the course is really flat, which is excellent, since I'm in Iowa and have been training indoors for much of the winter. I also had a brutal work schedule this month, so while I got in weekly 10-11 mile runs, my shorter, faster runs were more intermittent- maybe 2 on a good week instead of 2-4 consistently.
Thanks :)
 

Gunfighter 09

wants to be caribou ken
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Jul 31, 2005
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I just moved to Hawaii and have run a couple of the trails that they have in the mountains here. It is pretty awesome scenery wise, plus I feel like the cast of Platoon is always around the next bend patrolling. As a result I signed up for two trail half marathons, one in October and one in December. 
 
http://www.gunstockhalfmarathon.blogspot.com/
http://www.xterraplanet.com/xduro/championship.html
 
I have ran on two different trails a total of three times wearing my regular road running shoes. A friend told me that I need to get "trail" running shoes for the more challenging off road courses. I am not sure if this is true and I dont want to waste money. The trails here are littered with volcanic rocks, hardwood roots and all cross several streams, which also have wet, moss covered volcanic rock in them. The soil is clay where the volcanic rocks are not sticking through and there is a good 2-3" leaf/fallen vegetation bed on top of most of the clay. 
 
SoSH runners, any thoughts? Should I buy trail specific running shoes, and what brand/type etc should I go for? 
 

Trautwein's Degree

a Connecticut bicycle attorney in General Motor's
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Jul 20, 2005
11,689
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Just finished my run today. 43rd consecutive day of running at least one mile.  My goal is 365 for 365. I think this is the most difficult running challenge that I've set for myself. Some of the miles have been as fast as 6:05 others closer to 9:30 but that's not the thing. The thing is it's hard to put the shoes on every single day. It's really life altering. Loving it.
 

smastroyin

simpering whimperer
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Jul 31, 2002
20,684
Alright, question for the gallery from a relative newbie (again).
 
I was training (as such) to try and do the Quincy Half, which is next weekend.  However, between the weather (I know, poor excuse) and a minor knee issue last week (it was tender and I didn't want to risk it becoming something serious), I really never got to running anything longer than 10.5 miles.  I would like to do a half this year.  My next opportunity to do so (within my schedule) is the Cox Providence in early May.  I'm a little worried about the latter because of the fact that sometimes it is pretty warm, and I will be well into training for a Century ride which is the first week of June.  After that I would probably just wait until the fall.  At 230 lbs. warmer than 70 degrees would really be killer on me.  I have done 4 10 mile runs and each of them kind of sucked in terms of how I felt while running, so I'm a little nervous about throwing another 3 miles on.  On the other hand, I think I can be content just to finish the first one.  In my "training" the last few weeks I have been running anywhere from 9:15 to 9:45 pace and have been running essentially 3 times a week -  4, 7, 10 or thereabouts.  I have not really been training for any speed (fartleks, etc.).  I tested the balky knee this week but only ran 10K each time (though tonight I ran 8:45's which is great for my fat ass).  It seems stable.  
 
Obviously, the race is in 10 days, so there is no real training I can do in the interim to help me out, but I was thinking maybe if I didn't run much this week (I have a 5K race on Saturday, and then maybe run a 5 miler in the middle of the week) I might still be able to pull it off.  Thoughts?  
 
I should point out, I am leaving on a not very inexpensive trip to Cancun the following week, so there is also a thought in my head that I don't want to risk any injury that would ruin my fun. 
 

Kremlin Watcher

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Sep 20, 2005
4,243
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Smas - aerobically your body is almost certainly ready to run 13 miles. There is only a marginal difference between 10 and 13 to your energy systems and your CV system. The key here is your muscles and, more specifically, your lactic acid threshold. If you have done a number of 10 milers in the mid 9s and your legs have not blown up due to lactic acid problems, then you should be good at 13 miles, but you should prepare yourself mentally for some lactic acid discomfort toward the end. It shouldn't be catastrophic, but you'll get some burn by 11 or 12 and you'll need to gut out a mile or two. But if you prepare mentally for it, it should be manageable. Make sure you do a couple of important things: 1) keep your race pace close to your training pace, maybe a bit faster but not by more than 5-10%; and 2) take in some nutrition (energy gels or drinks) starting at about mile 6. The carbs will help stave off the muscle fatigue.

With only a week to go, you should do minimal running from here on out - like maybe 30-45 minutes three times, easy. You can't add any fitness in a week and it's more important to be rested than to go hard in the lead-in to an "A"
race day.

Good luck.
 

Jerrygarciaparra

My kid has superpowers
SoSH Member
Jul 31, 2001
3,207
Montpelier, VT
Oh, I'm sorry to hear it Kremlin!  Feel better soon.
 
20 degrees F and dry sidewalks today.

I finally feel like I'm getting into a groove. If I work really hard for the next two months I will be ready for that marathon.  Not sure if I'll meet my goal of 3:45 but I think I can get in the ballpark at least.
 

pedro1918

Member
SoSH Member
Mar 5, 2004
4,218
Map Ref. 41°N 93°W
Dear Runners:

We want to update everyone on some news pertaining to the ING New York City Marathon for both 2012 and 2013. We know everyone has been waiting for a marathon update, and we're happy to be able to provide some new information for this year's marathon.

As you may know, we issued our 2012 Marathon Resolution Options in January. The response was very strong, and we want to thank you and share with you the results of the resolution, as well as information regarding the runners who NYRR will be able to accommodate in the 2013 ING New York City Marathon.


2012 Marathon Resolution

Our primary goal was to provide the widest range of choices possible so runners could pick the option that worked best for them. Across the entire field, approximately 50 percent of runners chose to receive a refund and about 50 percent chose to run the marathon in 2013, 2014, or 2015 or the NYC Half 2013.


2013 Marathon Registration

This year, NYRR is committed to returning the ING New York City Marathon to its familiar place as an uplifting celebration of our great city. Our priorities in determining the 2013 registration process include maintaining the important diversity of our entry categories: NYRR members and local runners; participants from around the nation and the world, reflecting the diversity and global nature of NYC; and people running for charity (with an emphasis on NYC-based charities).

Based on the 2012 Resolution results, we are pleased to announce that in 2013, NYRR will be able to accommodate the following categories:

NYRR-member 9+1 qualifiers
Time qualifiers who achieved the standard in NYRR qualifying events
Those who have run 15 or more New York City marathons
Those who have earned guaranteed entry after being denied three times previously
Charity Partner Program participants
Those who entered through an International Travel Partner

Time Qualifiers

We regret that there will be limited availability for time qualifiers.

The overall pool of time qualifiers will be capped at 2,000; time standards and the qualifying window are posted on our website
Those who qualified during the window in an NYRR race (the 2013 Manhattan Half-Marathon, NYC Half 2012, 2012 Brooklyn Half-Marathon, 2012 Grete's Great Gallop, 2012 More Magazine/Fitness Magazine Women's Half Marathon, or 2012 Staten Island Half-Marathon) will be guaranteed non-complimentary entry
The remaining time-qualifier spots will be filled by a special random drawing; those not selected will be entered into the general marathon drawing. Specific details for applying will be posted on our website prior to the launch of the general Marathon application/registration

General Marathon Registration and Drawing

The general marathon drawing has been an integral element of the marathon for decades, as it gives everyone who desires a chance to run. Because of the diversity of options chosen by 2012 runners, and given our commitment to ensure a wide pool of runners in 2013, we will be able to hold the drawing this year. Given the accommodation of 2012 marathoners in the 2013 field, the drawing is expected to be smaller than in years past. Given our field-size limits, the number of entrants drawn will depend on the number of guaranteed entrants.

Registration to apply for the 2013 marathon will be open from April 24 to May 24. The non-guaranteed entry drawing will be held shortly thereafter. Further details and terms and conditions will be available on the Marathon website (ingnycmarathon.org) when the application is posted. Please be aware that all guaranteed entrants will have to complete the marathon application between April 24 and May 24. We will communicate details of the application process in the coming weeks.

All of us at NYRR want to thank each and all of you for your support and commitment to running, to the Marathon, and to the City of New York. We look forward to welcoming our runners, the New York community, and millions of local spectators and worldwide broadcast viewers back to the ING New York City Marathon this year, as we seek to inspire people through running and make Marathon Day 2013 a great one.

If you have any questions at all, please contact NYRR customer service at customerservice@nyrr.org.


Yours in running,

Mary Wittenberg
 

Gunfighter 09

wants to be caribou ken
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Jul 31, 2005
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Hit a big goal (for me) and finally broke 1:45 in a half marathon today. I ran the Hapalua half marathon in Waikiki in 1:43:45. It is a neat course, but was pouring rain at the start. Losing the iPod was certainly worth the time.
 

Kremlin Watcher

Member
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Sep 20, 2005
4,243
Houston, TX
Nice run Gunfighter.
 
If any of you SoSH running types are on the Upper West Side of Manhattan this Saturday, I will be one of the sponsors of the big multisport trade expo taking place at Columbia University from 10:00 to 5:00. Lots of interesting equipment and services displayed and opportunities to meet up with like-minded fitness geeks. My company is called myTri+Plus Racing and Fitness Coaching and my booth will be unmistakeable - white and neon green.
 

Kremlin Watcher

Member
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Sep 20, 2005
4,243
Houston, TX
For any Running Dogs who are interested, I will be at the Tri-Mania Summit and Expo tomorrow at MIT - it's a big trade show for triathlon, running, cycling and swimming. Drop by my booth if you have a chance.
 

HomeBrew1901

Has Season 1 of "Manimal" on Blu Ray
SoSH Member
Question for the running dogs...

I'm up to 4 miles of mostly running over a 42 minute span using the Zombies! Run 5k app. I do my running on the treadmill and I'm a bit sore after my runs, nothing a couple Advil can't cure. My question is how long should I go between runs? Would it be foolish to try and get another one in tomorrow after running today?
 

JGray38

Member
SoSH Member
Oct 31, 2003
2,945
Rockport, MA
Well, after years of really struggling with my running due to complications from a surgery 4 years ago, I'm finally getting the problem resolved. Triple neurectomy surgery on Tuesday. Hopefully I'll be back out there by the end of May.
 
I had a hernia surgery that damaged my inguinal nerve, leading to a chronic pain condition, which I'm on meds for. I could run, but pushing too hard would cause flare-ups that were quite painful and could last for days, (nothing quite like the random phantom kick to the balls) and trying to run through it only made it worse. I started favoring my left side without realizing it, too. Eventually, this led to my right side muscles being a lot weaker than my left, and caused all kinds of problems in my left knee and shin. I gave up fighting it this winter after going through a really rough patch pain-wise. I feel out of shape and lousy, but am looking forward to getting back out there in a month or so.
 
HB- go for it. Don't push it too hard. A light run after a day with some muscle pain/stiffness can really help. Once you get going, the aches and pains usually just melt away. Just take it easy.
 

BoredViewer

Member
SoSH Member
Jul 15, 2005
3,092
I'd like to take things down a bit...
 
I'm 39.  Lead a very sedentary lifestyle over the past 5 years... going from a fit 5'8" 165 to a not-so-fit 190.  
 
... (cut out a bunch of stuff)
 
Since X-mas, I've been running/jogging/staggering forward an average of 10 miles per week... 4x30+ mins with a gradually inproving pace.  So, 3 months in... weight fluctuates... but I'd say I've lost about 4-5 lbs.  
 
I'm trying to tell myself that if I kept up that pace, in 9 months I'd be very happy... but I also don't think I've made much progress in the past 6 weeks.  Does it get better?  Is this the end of hamburgers?  Do I need to run AND go to chicken, broccoli, and water?  HGH?
 
What the hell!?!?
 

dixielandbandana

Member
SoSH Member
Jul 15, 2005
229
Iowa City/Boston/Michigan
Question for more seasoned runners- I've been having right leg pain for the past week or so, in a different location and much more intense than shin splints I've had in the past.. I had x-rays done yesterday and was diagnosed with a distal/mid-tibia stress fracture.. I work with a sports med doc, who said I could take fewer runs, and run on grass rather than treadmill or concrete.. any advice on preventing recurrence, and the best way to keep up my fitness while I'm partly sidelined? I'm at about 30 miles a week, and I don't want to lose all of my cardio and have to start all over again when this is healed.. thanks!
 

Kremlin Watcher

Member
SoSH Member
Sep 20, 2005
4,243
Houston, TX
A lot of stuff going on in this thread. In order:
 

I'm up to 4 miles of mostly running over a 42 minute span using the Zombies! Run 5k app. I do my running on the treadmill and I'm a bit sore after my runs, nothing a couple Advil can't cure. My question is how long should I go between runs? Would it be foolish to try and get another one in tomorrow after running today?
Soreness is a natural by-product of gaining fitness. Running while mildly sore should not be a problem, as long as the soreness doesn't get significantly worse after each run. So to the extent that you are kind of sore after a run, it's perfectly safe to run the next day. If you are extremely sore, take a day off. Listen to your body - it will tell you what to do. If it hurts, don't run. If it's just a bit sore, run.
 

I had a hernia surgery that damaged my inguinal nerve, leading to a chronic pain condition, which I'm on meds for. I could run, but pushing too hard would cause flare-ups that were quite painful and could last for days, (nothing quite like the random phantom kick to the balls) and trying to run through it only made it worse. I started favoring my left side without realizing it, too. Eventually, this led to my right side muscles being a lot weaker than my left, and caused all kinds of problems in my left knee and shin. I gave up fighting it this winter after going through a really rough patch pain-wise. I feel out of shape and lousy, but am looking forward to getting back out there in a month or so.
Before you start running again, you should spend 6-8 weeks in the gym doing two things: core strengthening and spinning. All running/endurance strength starts in the core, especially if you have inguinal nerve and imbalance issues. My advice as a coach would be to do a core strengthening program to balance and strengthen your abdominals, back, pelvic and upper leg muscles before you run even one mile. In between core strength days, spin on a stationary bike to build some base cardiovascular and aerobic fitness. Once you've done this, you should be OK to start running again. But starting to run with the imbalance and abdominal issues that you describe is a recipe for serious problems. You have the rest of your life to run. Prepare for that rather than trying to run tomorrow.
 

Does it get better?  Is this the end of hamburgers?  Do I need to run AND go to chicken, broccoli, and water?  HGH?
The road to better fitness takes time. If you've been sedentary for years, turning the switch in your body and its metabolism from "off" to "on" takes time.
 
First and foremost, your view on weight loss and fitness, and your results, will depend on your goals. Are you in the "I just want to lose some weight and get in shape" frame of mind? Or are you in the "I want to run a 5K in 30 minutes within three months" frame of mind? Because weight loss and better fitness are completely different things. If all you do is want to lose weight, then you need to focus on diet and eating habits. There is a mountain of information both on this board and the internet in general on the causes of weight gain and how to lose weight. Straight weight loss is about 80% dependent on diet. So if that's your goal, find the right resources to change your eating habits.
 
If your goal is to improve fitness, that's a different approach to diet and exercise. There are also virtually unlimited resources out there for finding a training plan to meet your fitness goals. You can PM me if you have some more specific fitness goals and I would be happy to help point you in the right direction.
 

Question for more seasoned runners- I've been having right leg pain for the past week or so, in a different location and much more intense than shin splints I've had in the past.. I had x-rays done yesterday and was diagnosed with a distal/mid-tibia stress fracture.. I work with a sports med doc, who said I could take fewer runs, and run on grass rather than treadmill or concrete.. any advice on preventing recurrence, and the best way to keep up my fitness while I'm partly sidelined? I'm at about 30 miles a week, and I don't want to lose all of my cardio and have to start all over again when this is healed.. thanks!
Dude - seriously? If you have a stress fracture you should not be running at all, least of all on a treadmill. Stop running. Instead, go to your local gym and find a spinning class for the next six weeks. Spin like hell. Measure your projected running volume by hours (i.e. if you were planning on running 30 miles a week, measure that in terms of the time you were planning those miles to take) and then multiply that be at least two (three if you have the time) and that is how many hours per week you should spin. Cycling loads the leg muscles in a similar fashion to running except with a longer stroke, and has a huge benefit for running fitness (but the opposite is not true - running has almost no benefit for cycling fitness). Give your bones time to heal without the repetitive shock of the running foot strike. Heal up 100% before you start running again. Like I said above - you have the rest of your life to run. Running on a broken bone will not make it better.
 

dixielandbandana

Member
SoSH Member
Jul 15, 2005
229
Iowa City/Boston/Michigan
thanks the advice, KW! i know i need to rest it- it's just so frustrating hitting this roadblock when 2 weeks ago things were going great! I'm halfway through my residency, so it was already a struggle to find time to run consistently, so doubling or tripling the time for spinning unfortunately won't work.. but at least it means i won't have to start back from zero cardio when things get healed.. thanks for being clear, too! it definitely helps to hear it from another source, so i don't just tell myself to man up and ran through it!
 

Trautwein's Degree

a Connecticut bicycle attorney in General Motor's
Lifetime Member
SoSH Member
Jul 20, 2005
11,689
My Desk
HomeBrew1901 said:
Question for the running dogs...

I'm up to 4 miles of mostly running over a 42 minute span using the Zombies! Run 5k app. I do my running on the treadmill and I'm a bit sore after my runs, nothing a couple Advil can't cure. My question is how long should I go between runs? Would it be foolish to try and get another one in tomorrow after running today?
Immediately after your run, pound a chocolate milk. 
 

TallerThanPedroia

Civilly Disobedient
SoSH Member
Jul 19, 2005
17,188
Boston
Trautwein's Degree said:
Immediately after your run, pound a chocolate milk. 
 
I've been doing this for a little over a month now, and post hoc ergo propter hoc aside, I've been recovering from runs a lot better.
 

JGray38

Member
SoSH Member
Oct 31, 2003
2,945
Rockport, MA
Thanks for the advice Kremlin. I was doing exactly that in Nov-Dec, hitting the bike and doing core strength work at the gym. Amazing how much my right side lagged on the bike. Core strength exercises really exacerbated the problem and was part of the reason I shut it down and called a surgeon.

Surgery was today, hurt like a bastard, but I'm recovering. They were able to identify the source of the pain which gives me good odds of a pain-free future. Here's hoping, and I'll hit the bike in about a month, core work shortly after that.
 

underhandtofirst

stud who hits bombs
SoSH Member
Jul 25, 2005
1,552
Chelmsford, MA
A quick note here to all who have followed my training to finally run Boston yesterday.  Thanks for all the support.  My family and I are safe and back home.  I'll post a race report later on.
 

Zomp

Dope
Dope
Aug 28, 2006
12,364
The Slums of Shaolin
Hey guys, why Chocolate Milk?  I don't run much, but I do play soccer 4 nights a week as well as golf...if there is something with regards to helping sore muscles I'm listening...
 

TallerThanPedroia

Civilly Disobedient
SoSH Member
Jul 19, 2005
17,188
Boston
The idea is that it gives you an immediate injection of carbs (from the chocolate) and protein (from the milk) and in a good proportion. Milk has a couple of different proteins.
 
http://runnersconnect.net/running-nutrition-articles/is-chocolate-milk-really-a-good-recovery-drink-after-running/
http://www.askmen.com/sports/bodybuilding_200/247_fitness_tip.html
 
I buy these through Amazon's subscription service:
 
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002FWTEYY/ref=oh_details_o03_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 
They're aseptic, so I can just store them in my pantry, and then stick them in the fridge when I want to drink them cold after a training run, or stick them in my bag so I can drink them right after finishing a race.
 

Trlicek's Whip

Member
SoSH Member
Feb 8, 2009
4,511
New York City
Anyone here based out of or familiar with Colorado in May?
 
I'm running a Spartan Race at Fort Carson next weekend (May 4-5) and have no idea what to expect with 1) weather and temps and 2) the effects of altitude. I've done some nominal outdoor running in New England but wondered if any of you have any "don't leave home without it" type gear or accessories you like for outdoor weather and potential colder temperatures.
 

GregHarris

beware my sexy helmet/overall ensemble
SoSH Member
Jun 5, 2008
3,457
Jerrygarciaparra said:
I need to improve my speedwork.  Had a marathoner friend recommend doing mile repeats on the track.  4 or 5  7 minutes miles twice a week.
 
The pace depends on you really.  Do you have a baseline 5k to go by?  Try to do your repeats at 5k pace or slightly better.  Also twice a week seems excessive.  I'd do once a week and then work in some tempo miles for the other "substance" workout.
 

Gunfighter 09

wants to be caribou ken
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Jul 31, 2005
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Living in Hawaii seems to agree with me running wise. I hit another PR today (only by 30 seconds) on the Hibiscus Half Marathon in Honolulu, 1:43:11.  If anyone is looking for a Hawaii half to run, the Hapalua in March is much better run and has a cooler course than the Hibiscus, but they are both good races. 
 

TallerThanPedroia

Civilly Disobedient
SoSH Member
Jul 19, 2005
17,188
Boston
Gunfighter 09 said:
Living in Hawaii seems to agree with me running wise. I hit another PR today (only by 30 seconds) on the Hibiscus Half Marathon in Honolulu, 1:43:11.  If anyone is looking for a Hawaii half to run, the Hapalua in March is much better run and has a cooler course than the Hibiscus, but they are both good races. 
 
Great job!
 
My half PR from the weekend: 1:29:14. More later after I crunch some numbers.
 

GregHarris

beware my sexy helmet/overall ensemble
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Jun 5, 2008
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Last weekend was a weekend of PRs!
 
I also PRed my half --  1:32:48 and I felt like I left a little out there too.  I hope to get under 1:30 real soon.
 

TallerThanPedroia

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SoSH Member
Jul 19, 2005
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Okay I can't get the chart perfect but hopefully y'all get the idea. Those are all my half marathons, plus the two marathons, that I've run since we started this little thread.
 
[tablegrid= Distance Runs ]Race Time Pace Distance PR Change Course PR Change VDOT VDOT Marathon MacMillan Marathon 2xHalf+10 Jack Daniels Runners's World 2013 R2R 1:29:14 0:06:49 0:03:24 0:06:28 51 3:07:39 3:07:48 3:08:28 3:06:03 3:06:03 2012 BAA 1:32:38 0:07:04 0:03:04 0:09:00 49 3:14:06 3:14:57 3:15:16 3:13:03 3:13:08 2012 R2R 1:35:42 0:07:18 0:05:56 0:15:33 47 3:21:00 3:21:24 3:21:24 3:19:10 3:19:32 2011 BAA 1:41:38 0:07:45 0:03:46 0:03:46 44 3:32:23 3:33:53 3:33:16 3:31:07 3:31:54 2011 R2R 2:01:20 0:09:16     35 4:16:03 4:15:21 4:12:40 4:10:15 4:12:58 2008 BAA 1:45:24 0:08:03 0:05:51   42 3:40:43 3:41:49 3:40:48 3:38:56 3:39:45 2008 R2R 1:51:15 0:08:30 0:07:01 0:07:01 39 3:54:34 3:54:08 3:52:30 3:50:39 3:51:57 2008 PHX 4:16:48 0:09:48 0:00:55   34 4:22:03         2007 BSM 4:17:43 0:09:50     34 4:22:03         2007 R2R 1:58:16 0:09:02     37 4:04:50 4:08:58 4:06:32 4:04:14 4:06:35 [/tablegrid]
 
BAA = BAA Half Marathon in October, R2R = Run to Remember Half Marathon in May, PHX = Phoenix Marathon in January 2008, BSM = Baystate Marathon in Lowell in October 2007.
 
For those who don't remember, after the 2008 BAA Half, I had about 2.5 years of injuries and setbacks, and then a transition from extreme heel-striking in thick-soled shoes to forefoot striking in VFFs. So that 2011 R2R is in italics because I wasn't running it all out - I was just trying to finish. The BAA Half in 2011 was my return to where I left off three years earlier and that still hurts to type.
 
So, as you can see, I've always taken at least three minutes off my half marathon PR, and often take bigger chunks out of my PR for any given race, year to year. That suggests that, if I ran the BAA Half this coming October, I could get down around 1:26. So here's the question: can I BQ instead?
 
After running my first two marathons within three months of each other, I decided that actually running marathons was a bad way to train for them, since they take me so long to recover from. That leaves me with limited options for choosing a race to BQ with, since I'd like it to be local (for logistics) and familiar. So that only leaves me Baystate, which is fine, since it's popular for BQ'ing and for good reasons. Unfortunately it's no longer practical for actually getting a bib, since the BAA pushed up their registration date. People who BQ'd last year at Baystate have to wait for 2014 to try for a bib.
 
But my goal is the BQ. The bib is separate.
 
So over to the right are the results of various pace calculators, based on these half marathon times. I need 3:05:00 to qualify for the 2015 Marathon. By 2016, I'll be 35, and this all becomes academic, because I'll clearly be able to beat 3:10:00 by then. My original goal was to BQ before turning 30, so qualifying by falling out of my age group will feel like extra failure.
 
With VDOT, I'd need at least a 52, with 53 being much more solid, but I seem clearly on track for that. It also seems to be in the middle of the pack as far as projection along with MacMillan, with Jack Daniels and Runner's World being more optimistic, and the "double your half time and add ten minutes" rule of thumb being the most pessimistic.
 
While I'm happy with Sunday's 1:29:14, I would have been far happier with 1:27:30. I really don't want to wind up in a situation where I kill myself trying to squeeze in under 3:04:59. And I would, because I'm like that, so I'd rather have some cushion.
 
My other worry is that, well, I haven't run a marathon in five years. Both times, I had good first halves, and then broke down in the back halves. In Lowell, I remember doing like 1:58 in the first half, but then I broke down at 16 miles and had to stop and walk for a while, but then I recovered and finished well enough. Then in Phoenix, I had a similar first half and slowed in the second, but I was fine and feeling strong and on pace to knock about five minutes off my time, when my left hamstring tried to secede from my body in the 24th mile, and I barely managed to limp to a PR.
 
Still, I'm a much more experienced runner now, and I'll have a much better mileage base than I had for those runs. I ran a couple of 20 milers this spring at 8:00 and felt fine afterwards, and those crush almost every run in this chart.
 
Thoughts?