SOSH Running Dogs

Leather

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Jul 18, 2005
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GregHarris said:
RICE, foam roller, and targeted stretches will help a lot (hip flexors, hammys too), but I didn't really cut back on the amount of running, just the intensity.  I limited speed work and hard runs, but kept the miles up.
 
Did you get that stabbing pain?
 

bosoxsue

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fiskful of dollars said:
 
 
Yes. If your pain is on the head of your first/second metatarsal you may have Morton's neuroma. I deal with that over my second metatarsal and it's pretty painful. There are a few foot pads that work well for this condition. RICE therapy is your best bet. I would try a slim foot pad to cushion the impact. For me that's enough but I always have mild pain, especially on longer runs. I use these pads (Dr. Jill's Gel Ball Foot Cushions - you can find them on Amazon), they are awesome and they really never wear out.
 
Worst case may require an orthotic…as with all injuries rest is a good place to start, sucks when you're training though.
 
I tried linking it but I am an idiot.
 
 
Just ordered those foot pads using the SOSH Amazon portal -- last one in stock. Thanks for the recommendation. I hate the "rest" word, though. Who doesn't? 
 

Schnerres

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How much do you guys weigh?
 
I was always an active football(soccer) player, now i´m coaching(no more playing at the moment) for two more months and i´m starting running again. In my active playing days, running 10km was seen as a warmup and then we had training sessions of an hour in 30°C (those were the pre-season sessions to build stamina) and i could easily run 15km and ran my 9km house-track in 42minutes (some up and down included).
But going farther was never an option for me. I think i could have done a half marathon at those days (2 years past, i´m 33 now) and i think with 3-4 months of hard training over the summer, i can get there without much trouble. I weigh 93kg/205 pounds, while i´m 1,81m/5ft11 at the moment. If i train 3 months now until the summer, i guess it will come down to 88kg/194pounds, without much problems. But i have a bigger body, as i have big legs and a big upper body and probably never was below 85kg/187pounds for fifteen years, even though i was training twice (football), once had a match and twice went running in a week in my best days and i´m a studied sports teacher and had much other trainings as well.
I wonder if it is a good idea to even give it a go for a marathon with a bigger body. I mean, i will start running for now and see where it´ll end of course and a half marathon shouldn´t be a problem in the late summer, if i stick to training and no injuries happen. At 85kg/187pounds, i wouldn´t say i´m overweight, but of course there is a difference between having a bigger built body and having a runners´body.
 
I hate the cold weather, so now the weather (germany) is getting better (sun and +5°C) and i´m starting running again. Our easter break starts tomorrow, which should bring some extensive runs/walks to start.
 

GregHarris

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drleather2001 said:
 
Did you get that stabbing pain?
Along the IT band?  No. Not the band itself nor the knee, but I did get strong pain from my weak hip muscles that the band attaches to.
 
I am 5'9" 170 right now, which is 10 - 15 lbs more than my ideal running weight. Fracking winter.
 

Leather

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SydneySox said:
How about foot numbness... does anyone get that? I get that.
 
You might be tying the top of your laces too tight.  I do this sometimes, where instead of taking care to evenly tighten (to a comfortable level) the laces up the shoe, I just do a good jerk on the last lace cross and tie off.  
 

Joe Sixpack

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SydneySox said:
 
Remember when you got up at 4am to go to the fish markets after we got home at 2.30?
 
I still can't believe you couldn't eat the sashimi.
 
Yeah...It's pretty amazing that I made it out at that hour given the amount of alcohol I was drinking on that trip.
 
Raw fish isn't my thing, although I try to be open minded about trying everything when I'm visiting other countries. I ate a chicken head when I was in China. That was better than sashimi.
 

SydneySox

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fiskful of dollars said:
Try thinner socks…or no socks. See if that helps. Good luck. 
 
drleather2001 said:
 
You might be tying the top of your laces too tight.  I do this sometimes, where instead of taking care to evenly tighten (to a comfortable level) the laces up the shoe, I just do a good jerk on the last lace cross and tie off.  
 
 Tried both these things, including basically running with shoes not tight at all and unfortunately it didn't make a difference (except I got a blister when using no socks). I've swapped shoes and tied better but no change.
 
Unfortunately my feet go numb around 10km or so; on longer runs recently I've actually just run through it, it hurts like fuck, but the feeling has come back which suggests to me it's actually related to my foot or the way I run somehow. It is very frustrating.
 

SydneySox

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Joe Sixpack said:
 
Yeah...It's pretty amazing that I made it out at that hour given the amount of alcohol I was drinking on that trip.
 
Raw fish isn't my thing, although I try to be open minded about trying everything when I'm visiting other countries. I ate a chicken head when I was in China. That was better than sashimi.
 
Remember that raw fish smell? I mean I think we were still so drunk that we hadn't had time to get into hangover/throwup mode yet. 
 

rbeaud

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Jul 15, 2005
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SydneySox said:
How about foot numbness... does anyone get that? I get that.
 
I've had numbness like that on a few occasions.  Any chance your shoes need to be replaced?  It popped up a few weeks ago in my Asics GT-2000's which were approaching 500 miles.  Bought a new pair, this time Asics Trainer DS, and no more numbness.  I'll credit the new kicks, not the make/brand.  It also happened to me years ago playing rugby.  I never changed boots yet it went away.  So my shoe switch may have nothing to do with the solution...
 

rbeaud

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SydneySox said:
 I was going to get up early yesterday morning and simulate the start and not eat anything and do about 15k to see what would happen but I was too hungover. Did the run at 5pm instead. Fail. I'll try again next sunday. Results will likely be similar.
 
Ahhh....the story for my last two weekends.  Next week is a 16 miler with fast finish for the last 4 miles, really can't be doing the boozing thing!  I used to be an early morning guy (young kids, only time, yada yada).  Now with older kids I can run in the evening, sometimes with the the youngest (as opposed to pushing him as a baby!).
 
I feel like the early AM runs, sans fuel, improved my times and overall fitness.  Nothing more than 20k, I would say though.  Longer than that, for me, requires some form of energy replenishment.  I probably should try the mornings again to see if the times dip.  Couldn't hurt as I shoot for BQ at Vermont City.
 

SydneySox

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rbeaud said:
 
I've had numbness like that on a few occasions.  Any chance your shoes need to be replaced?  It popped up a few weeks ago in my Asics GT-2000's which were approaching 500 miles.  Bought a new pair, this time Asics Trainer DS, and no more numbness.  I'll credit the new kicks, not the make/brand.  It also happened to me years ago playing rugby.  I never changed boots yet it went away.  So my shoe switch may have nothing to do with the solution...
 
Just changed last weekend from Nike something to a pair of Adidas Boost glows (http://www.adidas.com.au/adistar-boost-glow-shoes/B26643.html) which did actually feel better but also didn't affect the numbess at all.
 
I'm trying different stretches but again, no real avail. It's frustrating. I can run through it but it's a frustrating pain for about 6km or so, if the last few runs where I've pushed through it are any indication. Happens trail and road as well.
 

sass a thon

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Are your toes going numb or your entire foot? It is just the pad of your foot or from the ankle down?
 

fiskful of dollars

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Syd - 
Sorry about the blisters, I should've recommended some Body Glide on your (sockless) feet . Now I feel like a dick.
 
Anyway back to the problem. Generally numbness is caused by circulatory issues in the foot or less commonly nerve impingement due to alignment/injury issues. Typically, if your feet go numb after a few miles and the numbness resolves within a minute or so after stopping, you are experiencing a circulatory issue. These problems are almost always due to poorly fitting shoes and socks. When you run your feet swell about ½ of a normal shoe size. Since thinner socks didn't help let's take a look at your shoes. Are they definitely the right size? If you have a running store nearby it might be worthwhile to get someone to check your running form and recommend an appropriate shoe for your particular foot strike. They will also check for proper fitting, width, etc. When you lace up your shoes is the toe/tongue box squarely lined up? The toe/tongue box should form a uniform rectangle from knot to bottom row of laces. If not you may have the wrong shoe/size/width, etc.
 
If your numbness persists for longer than a minute or two after stopping or is present when you are not running then you may have paresthesias from a nerve problem. This is much less likely and is much harder to diagnose/treat. 
 
Numb feet during a run suck….plain and simple. I hope you find a fix soon. Good luck with your training.
 

24JoshuaPoint

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drleather2001 said:
If your goal is just to finish a marathon, in a reasonable time, you might simply be over training.

Have you considered just doing a Hal Higdon plan?
 
Yup. I did Higdon plans on my first half and the two attempts at the fulls. I never ran more than 3 or 4 times a week on those. I think i might have just been unlucky. The first attempt I think i had the wrong shoes as i had always thought i was flat-footed b/c that's what they told me when i was younger. New Balance said that wasn't the case.
 
Gunfighter 09 said:
 
You are likely younger and lighter than me, but I have always found the bolded is a recipe for injury and painful wear. A day or two between runs seems to work best for me when trying to build up to distance. Also, I think sprint work outs and light weight lifting for your legs helps build the strength that turns into speed and durability. 
 
Right. For now i ran mostly every day from the beginning of the year just to gain some speed on shorter runs; less than five miles. I was able to bring my 5 mile race time down by nearly 45 seconds per mile and my legs feel great now. I'm going to work in some weight lifting as i ween off the every day running and start to increase the long run mileage. I'm hoping that all of these shorter high intensity runs are already adding some extra endurance which would be a bonus. I've never really run any short distance races till now so that's been added a fun bonus factor. The next short target is a 21 minute 5k. I'm somewhere around a 7:15 pace right now. It's a stretch but it'll be fun trying.
 

Joe Sixpack

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24JoshuaPoint said:
 
Right. For now i ran mostly every day from the beginning of the year just to gain some speed on shorter runs; less than five miles. I was able to bring my 5 mile race time down by nearly 45 seconds per mile and my legs feel great now. I'm going to work in some weight lifting as i ween off the every day running and start to increase the long run mileage. I'm hoping that all of these shorter high intensity runs are already adding some extra endurance which would be a bonus. I've never really run any short distance races till now so that's been added a fun bonus factor. The next short target is a 21 minute 5k. I'm somewhere around a 7:15 pace right now. It's a stretch but it'll be fun trying.
Hey, if it works for you, I say stick with the every day running. I typically run 7 times a week and at least 4 miles a day minimum. I think I've missed about 4 days of running since the start of the year.

In the past, when running only 3 or 4 times a week, I would often end up injured, usually after a hard workout or race. I've been completely free of injury since I started running every day and I've increased my mileage dramatically. I've never felt better, honestly.
 

TallerThanPedroia

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Bunt4aTriple said:
QFT.  I've missed at least 5 years in a row.  I am screwed.  TTP, have you got a ride down figured out yet?  If you or anyone else does, I'll bring the beer. 
 
I am terribly impatient when it comes to race shuttles and such.  I'm thinking I might just hike down to Pinkham notch afterwards and hitch to my car.
 
I like how you think I signed up for the lottery having thought about the logistics even in the slightest :)
 

Dollar

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I've been having problems similar to Syd's, where one of my feet becomes numb after five or six miles.  I think it might be the socks, since I've been wearing either very thin socks, or thicker socks that are much shorter and annoy me when they ride up around the top of the shoe.  Anyone have any socks they particularly like?  Luckily, I live in a place where it's basically 60-70 degrees year-round, so a pair that would be ideal for that weather would be perfect.  Any ideas?  Thanks!
 
edit: 
 
I'll throw in another question while I'm at it.  
 
I've been running about 5.5 miles every other day, at about a 9:15-9:30 pace per mile.  I just signed up for a road race in early May that is a 10k, then a ~30 min recovery stage, then a 5k.  Has anyone done anything like that?  I don't think I've actually run an organized race longer than a 5k, so I have no idea how to prepare for a race like this.  Any basic tips/resources that I can use leading up to the race?  I'd really like to start running more 10k's and half marathons, but I have no idea where to start and what I should be aiming for in terms of distance/pace to prepare.  I'd appreciate any advice. Thanks all!
 

knuck

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My wife had a similar foot issue last year, a few miles into the run it would fall asleep/go numb.
She ended up really loosening her laces and changed from underarmor socks to swiftkick socks and hasn't had a problem since.
 

Leather

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Dollar said:
I've been running about 5.5 miles every other day, at about a 9:15-9:30 pace per mile.  I just signed up for a road race in early May that is a 10k, then a ~30 min recovery stage, then a 5k.  Has anyone done anything like that?  I don't think I've actually run an organized race longer than a 5k, so I have no idea how to prepare for a race like this.  Any basic tips/resources that I can use leading up to the race?  I'd really like to start running more 10k's and half marathons, but I have no idea where to start and what I should be aiming for in terms of distance/pace to prepare.  I'd appreciate any advice. Thanks all!
You have a month, for all intents and purposes. So, I would simply stretch out one run per week by a mile each of the next four weeks at a slightly slower pace, say 9:45 per mile (so you top out at 9 miles a week before the race) and cutting back and resting the 4-5 days before the race. Run your regular 5.5 mile runs a tick quicker each week, too.

Then just run the 10k and 5k at a comfortable pace.
 

Leather

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Dollar said:
I've been running about 5.5 miles every other day, at about a 9:15-9:30 pace per mile.  I just signed up for a road race in early May that is a 10k, then a ~30 min recovery stage, then a 5k.  Has anyone done anything like that?  I don't think I've actually run an organized race longer than a 5k, so I have no idea how to prepare for a race like this.  Any basic tips/resources that I can use leading up to the race?  I'd really like to start running more 10k's and half marathons, but I have no idea where to start and what I should be aiming for in terms of distance/pace to prepare.  I'd appreciate any advice. Thanks all!
You have a month, for all intents and purposes. So, I would simply stretch out one run per week by a mile each of the next four weeks at a slightly slower pace, say 9:45 per mile (so you top out at 9 miles a week before the race) and cutting back and resting the 4-5 days before the race. Run your regular 5.5 mile runs a tick quicker each week, too.

Then just run the 10k and 5k at a comfortable pace.
 

Dollar

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drleather2001 said:
You have a month, for all intents and purposes. So, I would simply stretch out one run per week by a mile each of the next four weeks at a slightly slower pace, say 9:45 per mile (so you top out at 9 miles a week before the race) and cutting back and resting the 4-5 days before the race. Run your regular 5.5 mile runs a tick quicker each week, too.

Then just run the 10k and 5k at a comfortable pace.
Very helpful, thanks Dr. L.  My speed has definitely been increasing recently, and I could probably ramp up my distance as well (I usually turn around when I think I'm about halfway done, but I get home and I realize I still have a bit left in me, so I need to start pushing myself a little more).  I can't say I've ever run over 6 miles at one time, so it's pretty exciting to see how far I can take it with some more training.
 

Leather

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Just be careful not to increase total weekly mileage too quickly over successive weeks. That's how nagging injuries like shin splints and IT Band issues pop up.
 

Schnerres

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Do you run with a watch for the heartbeat?
Do you run according to your heartbeat and adjust the heartbeat or just to check it from time to time?
 

Leather

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Schnerres said:
Do you run with a watch for the heartbeat?
Do you run according to your heartbeat and adjust the heartbeat or just to check it from time to time?
 
There are other, far more experienced, runners on here than I.  That said: I have never paid much attention to my heart rate, per se.    I'm sure there are fitness benefits to being more aware of my heart rate, but the self-monitoring I already do, between my breathing, my overall fatigue, my stride/form, and any aches and pains I may be dealing with, is enough.  Adding another data point on top of that would just keep me out of "the zone" (for lack of a better term) where I can just run and maybe enjoy it.
 

fiskful of dollars

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I use a HR monitor mostly to ensure my recovery runs are done at an appropriate HR/zone. Also, it helps me to have at lease one empirical data point to guide my effort. That being said, I rely mostly on the same things dr.l does to monitor my training.
 
I use a HR monitor a lot more on indoor stuff…treadmill runs, bike trainer, etc. 
 

GreenMountain

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TallerThanPedroia said:
Anyone else running Boston besides me and Preacher?
 
I got in this year as well. This will be my first time running Boston (or any big city marathon), so any advice would be welcome.
 

graffam198

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Dollar said:
I've been having problems similar to Syd's, where one of my feet becomes numb after five or six miles.  I think it might be the socks, since I've been wearing either very thin socks, or thicker socks that are much shorter and annoy me when they ride up around the top of the shoe.  Anyone have any socks they particularly like?  Luckily, I live in a place where it's basically 60-70 degrees year-round, so a pair that would be ideal for that weather would be perfect.  Any ideas?  Thanks!
 
edit: 
 
I'll throw in another question while I'm at it.  
 
I've been running about 5.5 miles every other day, at about a 9:15-9:30 pace per mile.  I just signed up for a road race in early May that is a 10k, then a ~30 min recovery stage, then a 5k.  Has anyone done anything like that?  I don't think I've actually run an organized race longer than a 5k, so I have no idea how to prepare for a race like this.  Any basic tips/resources that I can use leading up to the race?  I'd really like to start running more 10k's and half marathons, but I have no idea where to start and what I should be aiming for in terms of distance/pace to prepare.  I'd appreciate any advice. Thanks all!
 
TINMA, but I have the same issue. My cause is sever over-pronation. Always has been the case. My right foot will go numb. There is a nerve that gets pinched and inflamed. So I stop, stretch, loosen laces, and this usually does the trick. I have had some success with orthodics, but since it is only 1 foot that I pronate on, it is a little weird for my gate to only have one insert in. As I have dropped weight, the issue has gradually improved. 
 
As an aside, I have got my fat ass running again. This thread has been inspiring and helpful. I ran cross country in college, got a desk job, got fat. Down 20 lbs since the new year, doing about 30 miles a week at 9:00-10:00 depending on elevation. Goal is to get back to racing weight by the end of the summer so I can be competitive again. (I was once sub 30 for an 8k, how far I've fallen)
 

TallerThanPedroia

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GreenMountain said:
 
I got in this year as well. This will be my first time running Boston (or any big city marathon), so any advice would be welcome.
 
Put a piece of duct tape (preferably a bright color) across the top of your bib and write your name on it. There is no sufficient way to describe the feeling of running 26.2 miles and having people shout your name the entire time.
 
As for Boston itself, same advice as any marathon: negative splits. If you overdo the downhills (and there's a big one right at the start, and another in Wellesley), your quads will revolt later on. Let people pass you in the early miles. You'll see them again in Newton.
 
If you have any specific questions, shoot. The logistics involved between picking up your bib at the Expo and getting into your corral on Monday can be a bit overwhelming, and can make actually starting to run something of a relief.
 
But really, just plan to enjoy yourself. There's nothing like it. The part of my body that was most sore after the race was my hand, from high-fiving hundreds of people.
 

Spelunker

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Well, maybe in *your* corral you can worry Scott slowing yourself down on those initial downhills. In my vague memory I didn't have much of a choice: it was jam packed and very slow moving ;)
 

SydneySox

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Hey, sorry not to poste in the thread. It's really good advice and I appreciate it.
 
I went to running in a pair of shoes so loosened that I'm not joking to suggest there was an inch of space on either side of the tongue/ankle area at the front when my foot hit the pavement and it flexed. I was running without socks as well. I have gone back to now running with more fitted shoes and socks with thicker impact cushioning at heel/toe. It hasn't really made a difference that I can see at all either way to my numbness issues, but it's more comfortable elsewise and also logically safer; I managed not to roll my ankle out of the loose shoe somehow.
 
Anyway, did another long run on the weekend (around the harbour, past the opera house and over the harbour bridge in stunning weather - very lucky to be here, as an aside, and that view and this almost-winter weather is perfect) and numbness came back around 10km and I ran through it again and it went away around 15 and then I did another 5 and it was fine. It's very strange and a very uncomfortable and painful middle period but there's also this awesome glass half full because then it feels fucking awesome at the end while everything else is starting to get achey.
 
I am thinking maybe it's my stride or something; like, as I get tired maybe I'm lazy in the middle but then the second gear kicks in later and it changes? I'm trying to analyse as I'm running but I honestly can't really tell or see how it's changing. Has anyone worked with a coach? I'm loathe as a part time fitness runner to start getting into the wankery of hiring a fucking running coach but it's so frustrating I might do it.
 

GreenMountain

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Thanks TTP, I like the name tag idea.
 
My family and I are going to stay in Boston on Sunday night (reserved a room a while back). I am planning to take one of the buses from Boston Common to the start area, which will suck because apparently I need to be at the departure area around 6:00am and will be in the start area for 2 to 2.5 hours before race time. Alternatively, I could get dropped off in Hopkinton, but I can only imagine the traffic disaster around Hopkinton on race morning. We are also trying to figure out where my family should watch from. I have a 5 and an 8 year old. They are pretty good kids, but somewhere with a little space to move around and play while they are waiting would be good. I would guess this means head out to somewhere mid-course, rather than in Boston itself? Not that familiar with the area.
 
Thanks.
 
 
TallerThanPedroia said:
 
Put a piece of duct tape (preferably a bright color) across the top of your bib and write your name on it. There is no sufficient way to describe the feeling of running 26.2 miles and having people shout your name the entire time.
 
As for Boston itself, same advice as any marathon: negative splits. If you overdo the downhills (and there's a big one right at the start, and another in Wellesley), your quads will revolt later on. Let people pass you in the early miles. You'll see them again in Newton.
 
If you have any specific questions, shoot. The logistics involved between picking up your bib at the Expo and getting into your corral on Monday can be a bit overwhelming, and can make actually starting to run something of a relief.
 
But really, just plan to enjoy yourself. There's nothing like it. The part of my body that was most sore after the race was my hand, from high-fiving hundreds of people.
 

TallerThanPedroia

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Jul 19, 2005
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GreenMountain said:
Thanks TTP, I like the name tag idea.
 
My family and I are going to stay in Boston on Sunday night (reserved a room a while back). I am planning to take one of the buses from Boston Common to the start area, which will suck because apparently I need to be at the departure area around 6:00am and will be in the start area for 2 to 2.5 hours before race time. Alternatively, I could get dropped off in Hopkinton, but I can only imagine the traffic disaster around Hopkinton on race morning. We are also trying to figure out where my family should watch from. I have a 5 and an 8 year old. They are pretty good kids, but somewhere with a little space to move around and play while they are waiting would be good. I would guess this means head out to somewhere mid-course, rather than in Boston itself? Not that familiar with the area.
 
Thanks.
 
 
I would consider Wellesley, after the college but before where the route crosses Route 9:
 
https://maps.google.com/maps?ll=42.31337,-71.271529&spn=0.025959,0.038581&t=h&z=15
 
The marathon route is Washington Street/Route 16 on that map. That Senior High/Hunnewell Field next to the Whole Foods might be a good spot for the kids. The crowds weren't super dense there, according to my admittedly jumbled memory. I saw a friend of mine near there last year and she's got three little kids that she brought. My parents were also around there, and managed to drive from there back into Boston and park in the Pru garage to meet me at the Dana-Farber gathering place at the Marriott.
 
As for Hopkinton, another option is to get dropped off at Hopkinton State park and take a BAA shuttle to the village:
 
http://www.baa.org/races/boston-marathon/participant-information/transportation-to-start-line.aspx
 
There's also a shuttle from the EMC parking lot on South Street. I don't think traffic actually gets all that bad. Just stick to Route 9.
 
What wave are you in?
 

bosoxsue

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Harry Agganis said:
First of three halfs in the Heartland 39.3 Series.
Rock The Parkway April 11
Garmin Half April 18
Running with the Cows May 8th
 
Good luck! That's quite the stretch.
 

BroodsSexton

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GreenMountain said:
Thanks TTP, I like the name tag idea.
 
 
There are variations on this, too.  I taped "Rocky" to my shirt when I ran my first marathon, and laughed every time someone yelled "Yo Adrian" at me, or blurted out a bit of "It's the, Eye of the Tiger, it's the thrill of the fight!"  I guess "Forrest" would also work.  Whatever gets you through...a guy I knew wrote "LaVar" as an homage to LaVar Arrington.  I never quite understood that.  And he definitely wasn't a "LaVar."
 

Spelunker

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Jul 17, 2005
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Safety tip: lots of folks write their name on themselves with sharpies. If you do so... wear sunscreen.

Some of us are still paying the price.
 

Harry Agganis

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Heartland 39.3 Series.
Rock The Parkway April 11 Complete in 1:47:03
Garmin Half April 18
Running with the Cows May 8th
 
Finished the first of the three. I was shooting for a 1:50 very pleased with my 1:47. That is a post 50 PR for me. I still had something left at the end. Going to shoot for a 1:45 next week. I started out with a "Smart Pacer" I will be doing the same next week
 

GreenMountain

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TallerThanPedroia said:
I would consider Wellesley, after the college but before where the route crosses Route 9:
 
https://maps.google.com/maps?ll=42.31337,-71.271529&spn=0.025959,0.038581&t=h&z=15
 
The marathon route is Washington Street/Route 16 on that map. That Senior High/Hunnewell Field next to the Whole Foods might be a good spot for the kids. The crowds weren't super dense there, according to my admittedly jumbled memory. I saw a friend of mine near there last year and she's got three little kids that she brought. My parents were also around there, and managed to drive from there back into Boston and park in the Pru garage to meet me at the Dana-Farber gathering place at the Marriott.
 
As for Hopkinton, another option is to get dropped off at Hopkinton State park and take a BAA shuttle to the village:
 
http://www.baa.org/races/boston-marathon/participant-information/transportation-to-start-line.aspx
 
There's also a shuttle from the EMC parking lot on South Street. I don't think traffic actually gets all that bad. Just stick to Route 9.
 
What wave are you in?
 
I like the Wellesley idea. I have relatives that will be watching in Natick, so that's also an option we are considering. Both sound better than hanging out in the crowds near the finish with the kids.
 
I am in wave 1, corral 6. If I take the buses from Boston Common I have to leave between 6 and 6:45 and will be hanging in the start area for about 2 hours. My group heads to Main St. to line up at 9:15. I appreciate the thoughts and advice. I definitely am planning on a throwaway shirt/sweatshirt. Sunscreen is also a good idea. Looks like it will be good weather, though in the 40's before race start. Good running temps.
 

24JoshuaPoint

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Health question -
 
Does anyone ever get pain in their hips/pelvis area after sitting for extended periods of time? My legs feel 100% fine when i'm not in the office but as soon as i sit down for a while i start getting pain in one leg in the sort of pelvis area which then affects my quad a bit. It seems to get a little worse with the more sitting i'm doing as the week goes on and then once i'm out for the weekend it feels fine. And typically once i workout or run after work it goes away until i'm sitting again for a while. It's like this carpal tunnel of the legs or something.
 

nomarshaus

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GreenMountain said:
I kept mine in check for months by doing foot exercises. Eventually it went away and never got bad enough to interfere significantly with training. Every morning before getting out of bed I flex my feet up so my toes are pulled up toward my shins. I do that a few times and it prevents the damage that can happen if the fascia is tight and you load weight on it. I also got in the habit of flexing and stretching my feet if sitting for any length of time. Heel drops help a lot as well. Stand with your forefeet on a stair with your heels projecting off and drop your heels down and back up to a neutral position. 10-15X per day. When that is easy try it one foot at a time. Worked for me anyway. Good luck.
Thanks, this helped a lot. Ran the half yesterday without much pain - a bit today, but manageable. i'll keep doing the stretches and exercises. ran 2:06, which is pretty good for me (personal best by 6 minutes, though it's only my 2nd half).
 
The pain seems to flair up the day after doing any speed training - if i'm doing 9-9:30 miles it's fine, but if I try to go faster - 7:30-8:30 miles or any kind of interval training, it hurts the next day. I'll just keep trying to strengthen I guess. Keeping losing weight should help too.
 

GreenMountain

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24JoshuaPoint said:
Health question -
 
Does anyone ever get pain in their hips/pelvis area after sitting for extended periods of time? My legs feel 100% fine when i'm not in the office but as soon as i sit down for a while i start getting pain in one leg in the sort of pelvis area which then affects my quad a bit. It seems to get a little worse with the more sitting i'm doing as the week goes on and then once i'm out for the weekend it feels fine. And typically once i workout or run after work it goes away until i'm sitting again for a while. It's like this carpal tunnel of the legs or something.
Did you ever have a lower back injury? I have a similar problem on long drives that goes back to an incredibly stupid/lucky stunt involving a closed ski area at night when I was 19. Messed up my lower back and I still have issues 17 years later. But I didn't die. So there's that. I just stretch a lot before driving and anytime I stop for gas on longer trips. Lumbar support also helps.
 
 
nomarshaus said:
Thanks, this helped a lot. Ran the half yesterday without much pain - a bit today, but manageable. i'll keep doing the stretches and exercises. ran 2:06, which is pretty good for me (personal best by 6 minutes, though it's only my 2nd half).
 
The pain seems to flair up the day after doing any speed training - if i'm doing 9-9:30 miles it's fine, but if I try to go faster - 7:30-8:30 miles or any kind of interval training, it hurts the next day. I'll just keep trying to strengthen I guess. Keeping losing weight should help too.
Good stuff! Nice work on the half. Remember that this is a very slow recovery process. 3-12 months depending on the severity of the injury. I kept setting mine back by pushing hard every time it felt better. The stretching definitely worked though. Glad to hear it is helping.
 

Leather

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Jul 18, 2005
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So, I went to an orthopedist about my knee, and I have runner's knee.  
 
It aches slightly below my outer knee cap when I run more than 3-4 miles, and gets worse from there.  She gave me a big clunky brace and referred me for physical therapy.  
 
In the meantime, any advice?  Exercises to do?  I've been working on strengthening my, erm, hips and glutes with a tension band and some other exercises, but I'm guessing there's some other stuff that's worked for people. 
 

24JoshuaPoint

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Did you ever have a lower back injury? I have a similar problem on long drives that goes back to an incredibly stupid/lucky stunt involving a closed ski area at night when I was 19. Messed up my lower back and I still have issues 17 years later. But I didn't die. So there's that. I just stretch a lot before driving and anytime I stop for gas on longer trips. Lumbar support also helps.
 
 
Yes, interestingly enough. I get the same thing on long drives too and i had it particularly bad with one certain car that for whatever reason was really bad. It was either when i was thrown from a horse or a falling backwards onto concrete during some pole vaulting practice that i broke the part that connects the spine to the pelvis. So i don't have that connection i guess and my spine is sort of free floating down there. I was told not to ride mechanical bulls any more for fear i might get paralyzed too easily.  I used to get back pain but then once i started strengthening the muscles around the spine the pain went away and it's been years since it's caused any issues. Maybe my occasional bad posture along with the previous back injury is the culprit. I'm going to ask my doctor at my next checkup if they can do anything. We have two people in our Danvers office that have gone to a standing style desk. I'm sure that would help it's just a bit of a major change.