The Unikornet

kazuneko

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Thought it was time Luke Kornet (dubbed “Big Bird” by Danny Ainge) finally got his own thread.
He’s played well off the bench the last two games (+20 plus/minus) and the Cs defense has been noticeably better since he first started getting more play in the 2nd half of the Cavs game. It’s a very brief stretch but so far he’s outplayed Vonleh and Griffin and looks like he very well might secure himself a rotation spot.
 

joe dokes

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Thought it was time Luke Kornet (dubbed “Big Bird” by Danny Ainge) finally got his own thread.
He’s played well off the bench the last two games (+20 plus/minus) and the Cs defense has been noticeably better since he first started getting more play in the 2nd half of the Cavs game. It’s a very brief stretch but so far he’s outplayed Vonleh and Griffin and looks like he very well might secure himself a rotation spot.
Maybe he's the anti-Kanter. Can't rebound well or play down low on offense, but *can* play defense and shoot from beyond 6 feet?
 

chilidawg

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Nice look at "the eclipse", his attempts to obscure a shooters view of the basket.

“Just being in the way is my whole shtick defensively,” Kornet said. “I just enjoy the intellectual side of working together to figure out what’s the way we can make this the hardest? That’s always a fun game. Contesting and making guys miss, that’s great.”

“As a big, I’m not like a lot of our guys who are super fast and can close out and stay in front, really make incredible plays,” Kornet said. “So it’s like, I’m really tall, so how can I be effective in that? I just figure it out because the game forces you to. So it works.”
The results: 2-for-8 shooting in three games so far, with one turnover by Evan Mobley and an and-1 by Rui Hachimura.

“I end up landing where, if a guy doesn’t shoot it, you’re right in front of them,” Kornet said. “So you realize all the times you’re flying out and jumping at guys, if I’m not really getting there, then what’s the point? So what can I do that isn’t a zero-sum game?”


https://theathletic.com/3749921/2022/11/01/celtics-luke-kornet-contesting-3s/
 

Fishy1

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Maybe he's the anti-Kanter. Can't rebound well or play down low on offense, but *can* play defense and shoot from beyond 6 feet?
Seems like a reasonable read. He's at 6.5 rebounds/ 36 mins in his career, which is worse than I would have guessed.

He's not great shakes, but I would much prefer the guy who is an average rebounder and provides some rim deterrence to the Kanter/Vonleh sieve. The team is much more watchable with him out there than Vonleh, imo.

2 blocks and .8 steals /36 min for his career, so he's decent at getting deflections for someone his size too. If he's sorted his shot out at all, I like what he offers (and the entertainment value) until Rob comes back or we find someone better. He's been using his verticality pretty well (well, except for that D Mitchell poster...).
 

Eddie Jurak

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John Karalis criticized "The Eclipse" because he says it means Kornet is not in position to block out his man.

For now, I am not taking a side. I kind of like it because it is something different that anecdotally seems to work.

As to Kornet more broadly, I think he is what he is: a replacement level big who might be a fit here as a temporary substitutie for Rob. Maybe there is a little bit of upside there if he can get minutes and develop? But I don't expect too much. I'm happy to have him here but under no illusions that he is good (in NBA terms).
 

chilidawg

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John Karalis criticized "The Eclipse" because he says it means Kornet is not in position to block out his man.

For now, I am not taking a side. I kind of like it because it is something different that anecdotally seems to work.

As to Kornet more broadly, I think he is what he is: a replacement level big who might be a fit here as a temporary substitutie for Rob. Maybe there is a little bit of upside there if he can get minutes and develop? But I don't expect too much. I'm happy to have him here but under no illusions that he is good (in NBA terms).
I heard that, but it seems to me he's usually doing it instead of trying to close out, in which case he'd be even more out of rebounding position. Kudos for at least trying something different and recognizing his limitations.
 

CoffeeNerdness

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I heard that, but it seems to me he's usually doing it instead of trying to close out, in which case he'd be even more out of rebounding position. Kudos for at least trying something different and recognizing his limitations.
I've never played more than pick-up hoop so I'm happy to be corrected but the hapless closeout/block attempt seems like one of the more useless plays a player can make which is likely driven by the sports mantra of "showing some hustle" much like sliding into first base or diving for a ball you have zero chance of catching. Good on Luke for thinking outside of the box. I could actually see this being a thing that gets picked up by other players if the numbers bear out that it's effective.
 

lovegtm

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I've never played more than pick-up hoop so I'm happy to be corrected but the hapless closeout/block attempt seems like one of the more useless plays a player can make which is likely driven by the sports mantra of "showing some hustle" much like sliding into first base or diving for a ball you have zero chance of catching. Good on Luke for thinking outside of the box. I could actually see this being a thing that gets picked up by other players if the numbers bear out that it's effective.
He's doing his darnedest to rack up a sample size for those numbers quickly!
 

chilidawg

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I've never played more than pick-up hoop so I'm happy to be corrected but the hapless closeout/block attempt seems like one of the more useless plays a player can make which is likely driven by the sports mantra of "showing some hustle" much like sliding into first base or diving for a ball you have zero chance of catching. Good on Luke for thinking outside of the box. I could actually see this being a thing that gets picked up by other players if the numbers bear out that it's effective.
The Athletic piece showed Jaylen doing it as well.
 

TripleOT

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I hope Rob doesn’t do it when he comes back. Goaltending a three point shot is a bad idea and Rob would probably hit the ball if he jumped his highest.

Regarding the blocking out argument, if a center is sprinting to the corner to contest the three-pointer, he’s probably not doing a lot of blocking out after that. At least with Kornet’s jump, he can turn around and maybe grab the ball if it bounces back his way on a long rebound. Also, if a center is sprinting to the corner to contest the three-pointer, he’s probably not doing a lot of blocking out after that. At least with the Kornet jump, he can turn around and maybe grab the ball if it bounces back his way on a long rebound.

Somebody needs to come up with a clever name for a player jumping up in the air to restrict the site line of a three point shooter
 

CreightonGubanich

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And Kornet's explanation was pretty well reasoned. Unlike Time Lord, he's not in a position, or athletic enough, to get out and contest those shots anyway. If he tries, and manages to run someone off the three point line, they're just going to go around him. Doing what he's doing, he's still in position to guard the guy if he forgoes the shot and tries to drive. So it's really that or nothing.

I don't think it'll catch on as a trend, and certainly not with Rob. He enjoys actually blocking shots too much, and he blocks more jump shots than anyone I can remember. I think it's a response to Kornet's unique size and skill set.
 

chilidawg

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I hope Rob doesn’t do it when he comes back. Goaltending a three point shot is a bad idea and Rob would probably hit the ball if he jumped his highest.

Regarding the blocking out argument, if a center is sprinting to the corner to contest the three-pointer, he’s probably not doing a lot of blocking out after that. At least with Kornet’s jump, he can turn around and maybe grab the ball if it bounces back his way on a long rebound. Also, if a center is sprinting to the corner to contest the three-pointer, he’s probably not doing a lot of blocking out after that. At least with the Kornet jump, he can turn around and maybe grab the ball if it bounces back his way on a long rebound.

Somebody needs to come up with a clever name for a player jumping up in the air to restrict the site line of a three point shooter
"The Eclipse" they're calling it.
 

Eddie Jurak

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To do it right, Kornet needs to jump early. He’s got to be read that a shot is coming and get up there before the shot is released. If he jumps when the shooter does, it is already too late.
 

kazuneko

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Kornet got a surprising DNP against NY tonight, one day after what I thought was his best game as a Celtic.
Although the counting stats weren't impressive ( he did get 2 blocks) the defense looked at its best when he was on the floor against Chicago, and he ended up leading the team in +/- with a +17.
 

lovegtm

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Kornet got a surprising DNP against NY tonight, one day after what I thought was his best game as a Celtic.
Although the counting stats weren't impressive ( he did get 2 blocks) the defense looked at its best when he was on the floor against Chicago, and he ended up leading the team in +/- with a +17.
Guessing he was held out of the b2b since he's still recovering from the ankle, and they didn't feel the need to make up an injury like with Horford.
 

TripleOT

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Kornet was away from the team for personal reasons that Abby Chin described as good.
I didn’t even realize that he didn’t play in the Knicks game, even though I watched every second of the game. I am not a fan, and don’t think he can play real minutes on a contender in the playoffs. However, he has had some moments where he has been a serviceable backup big.

he really needs to play with more confidence. It would also help if he tries to contest some shots by actually jumping.
 

Fishy1

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I didn’t even realize that he didn’t play in the Knicks game, even though I watched every second of the game. I am not a fan, and don’t think he can play real minutes on a contender in the playoffs. However, he has had some moments where he has been a serviceable backup big.

he really needs to play with more confidence. It would also help if he tries to contest some shots by actually jumping.
Who wants him to play real playoff minutes on a contender? I don't think there's anyone on this board who thinks that we'd be anything but in trouble if that happened.

Kornet has a lot of holes in his game, but this really isn't a fair criticism of his game. He stays on the ground a lot of the time because he doesn't have to jump at 7'2 and he's incredibly unathletic. If he jumps, he's not going to be able to move again for a couple of seconds. In the 2000 or so NBA minutes he's played, he's averaged 2 blocks and .9 steals per 36 minutes for his career. That's just fine for a 3rd string big. He's been doing what they need him to do in the 10-20 minutes he's been playing.

I enjoy rooting for him. He tries to play within himself on offense and defense: being in the right spot, forcing the other team into mid-range jumpers, and moving the ball. It's better than watching Tristan Thompson force jump hooks for my money.
 
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Eddie Jurak

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I didn’t even realize that he didn’t play in the Knicks game, even though I watched every second of the game. I am not a fan, and don’t think he can play real minutes on a contender in the playoffs. However, he has had some moments where he has been a serviceable backup big.

he really needs to play with more confidence. It would also help if he tries to contest some shots by actually jumping.
I don't entirely know how to respond to this. He's a replacement level NBA big who gets paid like a replacement level NBA big. He's one of four guys in the mix for 3rd string center minutes in Boston (with Blake, Vonleh, and Grant). With Rob out they all slide up the depth chart a notch. He's flawed because that is what you get when you explore the replacement level big bargain bin.
 

PedrosRedGlove

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I didn’t even realize that he didn’t play in the Knicks game, even though I watched every second of the game. I am not a fan, and don’t think he can play real minutes on a contender in the playoffs. However, he has had some moments where he has been a serviceable backup big.

he really needs to play with more confidence. It would also help if he tries to contest some shots by actually jumping.
Yeah, that's really good for us because without serviceable back up bigs we'd be SOL until Rob Williams returns, and still thin then.

Posted this earlier in general thread discussion, but Kornet really is exceptionally unathletic for a professional athlete. I found a draft profile describing him as a below the rim player, despite the fact his standing reach is 9'6". He's gonna have to get by on guile and playing within his limitations. Seeing him try to be creative and innovative defensively is encouraging, even if it's also a bit goofy to watch.
 

TripleOT

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I don't entirely know how to respond to this. He's a replacement level NBA big who gets paid like a replacement level NBA big. He's one of four guys in the mix for 3rd string center minutes in Boston (with Blake, Vonleh, and Grant). With Rob out they all slide up the depth chart a notch. He's flawed because that is what you get when you explore the replacement level big bargain bin.
Obviously we would prefer to find a hit with the replacement level big bargain bin. I’m guessing we will find that the trade deadline or in the buyout market.
 

chilidawg

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Obviously we would prefer to find a hit with the replacement level big bargain bin.
Yeah, I think this is POBOS's short term strategy, take a chance that one of Kornet/Griffin/Vonleh/Kabengele emerges as a viable 3rd option at C. If not, trade deadline upgrade. I'm still irrationally hopeful about Kabengele, he definitely seems to have more upside than the alternatives. To Kornet's credit the team has played well when he's on the floor.
 

JakeRae

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Yeah, I think this is POBOS's short term strategy, take a chance that one of Kornet/Griffin/Vonleh/Kabengele emerges as a viable 3rd option at C. If not, trade deadline upgrade. I'm still irrationally hopeful about Kabengele, he definitely seems to have more upside than the alternatives. To Kornet's credit the team has played well when he's on the floor.
They don’t need a great 3rd string 5, they need their first string 5 on the court. I’m starting to think that this is the season Horford shifts to a bench role, and I think the he current roster is constructed such that we’re not going back to the 2-big rotation we ran last year. The 4 role is going to be predominantly filled this year by Tatum and Grant (plus maybe limited Gallinari minutes if he gets healthy too). That’s because not only is our third string 5 not a top 10 talent on our team, it will be hard to acquire a 5 that is, and even harder to acquire one that cracks our top 8 (i.e., core playoff rotation).

A ranking of our roster by talent looks something like:

Tatum
Brown
Timelord
Smart
Brogdon
White
Horford
Grant
Gallinari (if healthy)
Hauser
[matchup dependent]

This isn’t last year, where the team was dreadfully thin after the top 6 or 7 players going into the deadline. They’ve since added White and Brogdon, who are both quality NBA starters, Hauser has developed into a rotation level player, and Grant has continued to progress, plus Gallinari remains a possibility. The level of talent they’d need to acquire to really make a difference this year is significantly different, and therefore it’s a lot less likely we make a move. That’s a good thing though. Brad did work last deadline and this offseason, and we are sitting in a position where it’s much more likely we are playing in the buyout market than the trade market at the deadline.
 

DeJesus Built My Hotrod

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They don’t need a great 3rd string 5, they need their first string 5 on the court. I’m starting to think that this is the season Horford shifts to a bench role, and I think the he current roster is constructed such that we’re not going back to the 2-big rotation we ran last year. The 4 role is going to be predominantly filled this year by Tatum and Grant (plus maybe limited Gallinari minutes if he gets healthy too). That’s because not only is our third string 5 not a top 10 talent on our team, it will be hard to acquire a 5 that is, and even harder to acquire one that cracks our top 8 (i.e., core playoff rotation).

A ranking of our roster by talent looks something like:

Tatum
Brown
Timelord
Smart
Brogdon
White
Horford
Grant
Gallinari (if healthy)
Hauser
[matchup dependent]

This isn’t last year, where the team was dreadfully thin after the top 6 or 7 players going into the deadline. They’ve since added White and Brogdon, who are both quality NBA starters, Hauser has developed into a rotation level player, and Grant has continued to progress, plus Gallinari remains a possibility. The level of talent they’d need to acquire to really make a difference this year is significantly different, and therefore it’s a lot less likely we make a move. That’s a good thing though. Brad did work last deadline and this offseason, and we are sitting in a position where it’s much more likely we are playing in the buyout market than the trade market at the deadline.
In addition, the list of known realistic targets is really thin. Poetl has been mentioned but again that player is likely to have a lot of interest.

There are just no obvious deals given that a lot of UFAs are pieces on presumed contenders, many of those players aren't really upgrades for Boston (as you note) or don't do fill a role of need.

That said, there are situations yet to develop and Stevens seems to be adept at finding fits in less trafficked markets.
 

kazuneko

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Another good game for Kornet. Plus/minus of +10 and it was noticeable. He doesn’t put up big counting stats but he consistently been makes good plays on both sides of the ball..
 

lovegtm

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Another good game for Kornet. Plus/minus of +10 and it was noticeable. He doesn’t put up big counting stats but he consistently been makes good plays on both sides of the ball..
Playing with more force now. He looked VERY tentative on both ends post-injury. He's never going to be an athletic monster, but the guy has played real minutes in the league before and needs to have more confidence.
 

TripleOT

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Kornet is growing on me as a backup big. He made some nice offensive plays in the Denver game, like the reverse put back dunk, and a catch and swing pass to Hauser for his only three of the game. One of the reasons I’ve been down on him is his lack of aggression.
 

BaseballJones

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Complaining about blocking out is one step up the old man hoop fan spectrum from "how is that not a travel".
I'm reeling from this comment.

I mean, the shoe fits in my case, but here's the thing. Blocking out is still the best way to get rebounds. Sealing off your man improves your chances for a rebound dramatically. You can just watch the difference in a Syracuse basketball game. They play that zone and when the shot goes up, they all just turn and watch the ball, and when it hits the rim, they try to jump and snag it. They pay little to no attention to the opposition slashing between them to get the rebound. When guys box out, it's amazing how often they actually get rebounds. Especially compared to when they don't.

I spoke to a college football team the other day and talked about how you build ON the fundamentals, but you never move PAST them. Like a huge oak tree, the taller it gets, the deeper the roots have to be. The coaches were all in the back nodding.

And blocking/boxing out is, frankly, 90% an effort thing. You just gotta commit to doing it. But if you do, you'll get far more defensive rebounds than you would if you don't block out. It's just true.

Ok, old man rant over. :)
 

Eddie Jurak

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Kornet is growing on me as a backup big. He made some nice offensive plays in the Denver game, like the reverse put back dunk, and a catch and swing pass to Hauser for his only three of the game. One of the reasons I’ve been down on him is his lack of aggression.
He absolutely needs to be more aggressive, but he seems to be trending in the right direction at least.
 

TripleOT

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And blocking/boxing out is, frankly, 90% an effort thing. You just gotta commit to doing it. But if you do, you'll get far more defensive rebounds than you would if you don't block out. It's just true.

Ok, old man rant over. :)
It’s technique, awareness, and effort. Especially now that refs call faceguarding loose ball fouls, proper technique is important. Awareness and feel, anticipating where a shot will be launched, where the player you need to box out will be, how the shot likely will carom, etc is important. Effort and commitment certainly is too.

Boxing out is a key fundamental, just like taking a charge correctly. Do it sloppily, or don’t do it, and you likely will be giving up points.
 

phineas gage

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They don’t need a great 3rd string 5, they need their first string 5 on the court.
Seconded. It is not exactly the harsh light of revelation, but a Celtics championship this season comes down to a healthy Time Lord.

If they have that, the back end of the bench is more than fine.
 

TripleOT

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Seconded. It is not exactly the harsh light of revelation, but a Celtics championship this season comes down to a healthy Time Lord.

If they have that, the back end of the bench is more than fine.
I think they have enough offense to actually win a title with the team they have playing right now and a decent in season addition big, but if they can get Robert Williams healthy to me they are a clear favorite to win the title. They are currently an historically great offense, and were a historically great defense the last half of last season with a healthy TL. Even if they can get him on the court for 20 minutes a game, this team is going to be even more beastly
 

chilidawg

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Seconded. It is not exactly the harsh light of revelation, but a Celtics championship this season comes down to a healthy Time Lord.

If they have that, the back end of the bench is more than fine.
Having a productive bench allows you to rest the starters and still win games. Gets you a better seed and into the playoffs healthier and rested. End rant.
 

benhogan

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I'm reeling from this comment.

I mean, the shoe fits in my case, but here's the thing. Blocking out is still the best way to get rebounds. Sealing off your man improves your chances for a rebound dramatically. You can just watch the difference in a Syracuse basketball game. They play that zone and when the shot goes up, they all just turn and watch the ball, and when it hits the rim, they try to jump and snag it. They pay little to no attention to the opposition slashing between them to get the rebound. When guys box out, it's amazing how often they actually get rebounds. Especially compared to when they don't.

I spoke to a college football team the other day and talked about how you build ON the fundamentals, but you never move PAST them. Like a huge oak tree, the taller it gets, the deeper the roots have to be. The coaches were all in the back nodding.

And blocking/boxing out is, frankly, 90% an effort thing. You just gotta commit to doing it. But if you do, you'll get far more defensive rebounds than you would if you don't block out. It's just true.

Ok, old man rant over. :)
+1 (and deep-down it's really a Syracuse hoops rant)
 

Jimbodandy

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I'm reeling from this comment.

I mean, the shoe fits in my case, but here's the thing. Blocking out is still the best way to get rebounds. Sealing off your man improves your chances for a rebound dramatically. You can just watch the difference in a Syracuse basketball game. They play that zone and when the shot goes up, they all just turn and watch the ball, and when it hits the rim, they try to jump and snag it. They pay little to no attention to the opposition slashing between them to get the rebound. When guys box out, it's amazing how often they actually get rebounds. Especially compared to when they don't.

I spoke to a college football team the other day and talked about how you build ON the fundamentals, but you never move PAST them. Like a huge oak tree, the taller it gets, the deeper the roots have to be. The coaches were all in the back nodding.

And blocking/boxing out is, frankly, 90% an effort thing. You just gotta commit to doing it. But if you do, you'll get far more defensive rebounds than you would if you don't block out. It's just true.

Ok, old man rant over. :)
Fwiw, I'm all for boxing out (and old man here too). It's still a great thing. But with so many more attempts being 3s now, it just matters so much less than it used to. The mindset of gang rebounding and the effort to focus on it is still important of course. Boards matter.
 

Eddie Jurak

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Be honest. If someone told you:

1. A Celtic center put up this line: 25 minutes, 7-7 from the field, 15 points, 8 rebounds, 1 assist, 4 blocks, 1 turnover.
2. This player converted several lobs/putbacks and blocked a Trae Young 3 attempt.

Knowing nothing else you would think this player must be Rob Williams, no?

Some of those stats were accumulated during garbage time, including the one corner three he hit, but he was solid throughout the game.

There is something of a player here. Assuming Rob comes back on schedule, lots of potential to load manage and keep Al and Rob's minutes under control.
 

joe dokes

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He's fine for where he's supposed to be, but the next contested rebound he gets will be among his first. Not that there's anything especially wrong with that. He does other things pretty well for the 10th or 11th guy in the chart, and there's no rule that says your tallest guy has to be your best rebounder, but I'd shudder at him being the only real big guy out there, whereas RW could probably hold his own with 4 relative smurfs.
 

Fishy1

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He's fine for where he's supposed to be, but the next contested rebound he gets will be among his first. Not that there's anything especially wrong with that. He does other things pretty well for the 10th or 11th guy in the chart, and there's no rule that says your tallest guy has to be your best rebounder, but I'd shudder at him being the only real big guy out there, whereas RW could probably hold his own with 4 relative smurfs.
I mean he literally did that last night, playing a lot of minutes against a good rebounder in Okongwu and overlapping with a great one in Capela and holding his own. He was also the only big guy out there for most of his minutes. Per 36 he's averaging 4 ORB and 5 DRBs and 3 blocks.

People keep saying "he's fine for whatever he's supposed to be" and "I'd panic if he was starting," and that's ignoring what he's actually doing out there. Nobody wants him starting for us, but he was very good last night and a big part of stymieing the Hawks guards. Asking him to rim run rather than pick and pop has been great for him.

I think he's an NBA backup big, and I'm happy Mazzulla is playing him over Vonleh, and I don't think the C's should really be in a rush to replace him, nevermind send off a first-rounder for Poetl (as I agree with HRB that we don't need to send picks off for him if we want to sign him). I think conventional wisdom has told us Kornet is bad because he looks goofy and thin out there, but he knows where he's supposed to be out on the court, sets good screens on ball and off ball, rebounds decently, is often in the right spot under the basket for a dish, and is the best rim deterrence we have right now.

There's a long history of ground-bound goofy bigs doing well in this league because they know how to position themselves and help their teammates, and I think Kornet has come a long way in figuring that stuff out. Hauser, for example, who people love because he's doing the flashy thing and hitting threes (and I like it too!) has overlapped with him a lot and has benefitted from his off-ball screens. Ultimately I'm in the time will tell camp, he could still fall apart, get exposed more, etc. -- I would want to see him play a lot more to be sure -- but the eye test has been encouraging so far, and with the offense chugging along like it is, there should be no rush to rock the boat. In fact, I think the Celtics are invested in seeing what they've got in him.

EDIT: I should add, obviously if Horford were to go down or Rob were to show more ill effects of the knee surgery, the pressure to go find another big would go up. But as constructed I think Kornet is a good fit on this roster and we should be darn grateful to have him out there over Blake and Vonley.
 
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Koufax

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And he's shooting 50% on 3s. Who needs Sam Hauser when you have Luke Kornet? ;)
 

CreightonGubanich

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I mean he literally did that last night, playing a lot of minutes against a good rebounder in Okongwu and overlapping with a great one in Capela and holding his own. He was also the only big guy out there for most of his minutes. Per 36 he's averaging 4 ORB and 5 DRBs and 3 blocks.

People keep saying "he's fine for whatever he's supposed to be" and "I'd panic if he was starting," and that's ignoring what he's actually doing out there. Nobody wants him starting for us, but he was very good last night and a big part of stymieing the Hawks guards. Asking him to rim run rather than pick and pop has been great for him.

I think he's an NBA backup big, and I'm happy Mazzulla is playing him over Vonleh, and I don't think the C's should really be in a rush to replace him, nevermind send off a first-rounder for Poetl (as I agree with HRB that we don't need to send picks off for him if we want to sign him). I think conventional wisdom has told us Kornet is bad because he looks goofy and thin out there, but he knows where he's supposed to be out on the court, sets good screens on ball and off ball, rebounds decently, is often in the right spot under the basket for a dish, and is the best rim deterrence we have right now.

There's a long history of ground-bound goofy bigs doing well in this league because they know how to position themselves and help their teammates, and I think Kornet has come a long way in figuring that stuff out. Hauser, for example, who people love because he's doing the flashy thing and hitting threes (and I like it too!) has overlapped with him a lot and has benefitted from his off-ball screens. Ultimately I'm in the time will tell camp, he could still fall apart, get exposed more, etc. -- I would want to see him play a lot more to be sure -- but the eye test has been encouraging so far, and with the offense chugging along like it is, there should be no rush to rock the boat. In fact, I think the Celtics are invested in seeing what they've got in him.
Yeah, I think it's clear at this point that Kornet is a perfectly serviceable backup big. Whether you want him in the rotation or on the fringes of the rotation is an open question, but for this particular team, he's fine. All they need a bench big to do is not break the defense, and Kornet does that while adding some intriguing offensive possibilities, even if they're not fully developed.

The three headed monster of Blake Griffin, Noah Vonleh, and Luke Kornet is perfectly fine. They all bring something a little different; I think Kornet has the most upside of the bunch, but they can all play. I'd rather keep the trade assets ready for a big with more upside than Jakob Poetl.
 

128

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The three headed monster of Blake Griffin, Noah Vonleh, and Luke Kornet is perfectly fine. They all bring something a little different; I think Kornet has the most upside of the bunch, but they can all play. I'd rather keep the trade assets ready for a big with more upside than Jakob Poetl.
I think you might be underestimating Poetl. In less than 29 minutes a game he's averaging 13.4 points, 10.1 rebounds, 3.7 assists and 1.2 blocks and shooting 66 percent from the floor. He's poor from the line, which is worrisome, but he's a damn good center.
 

HomeRunBaker

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Yeah, I think it's clear at this point that Kornet is a perfectly serviceable backup big. Whether you want him in the rotation or on the fringes of the rotation is an open question, but for this particular team, he's fine. All they need a bench big to do is not break the defense, and Kornet does that while adding some intriguing offensive possibilities, even if they're not fully developed.

The three headed monster of Blake Griffin, Noah Vonleh, and Luke Kornet is perfectly fine. They all bring something a little different; I think Kornet has the most upside of the bunch, but they can all play. I'd rather keep the trade assets ready for a big with more upside than Jakob Poetl.
What else would we use our future trade assets for to improve this team? If the price is Gallo and a future 1st & 2nd it’s a no-brainer unless we feel there is a better fit on the expiring market out there. With TL’s health I’m not sure that there would be. Of course if it’s Gallo and picks this thread will be repetitive every day until Dec 15th when Gallo is eligible to be traded.
 

lovegtm

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What else would we use our future trade assets for to improve this team? If the price is Gallo and a future 1st & 2nd it’s a no-brainer unless we feel there is a better fit on the expiring market out there. With TL’s health I’m not sure that there would be. Of course if it’s Gallo and picks this thread will be repetitive every day until Dec 15th when Gallo is eligible to be traded.
I guess the only thing we haven't done is look through who the non-Poeltl centers are who are making $8-12M?

I agree that it's the obvious place to upgrade the team, and we know Brad likes to maximize roster quality across the board, so I expect to see a center happen (people forget that he went out and got Theis at $9M last year even when TL and Al were both healthy).
 

HomeRunBaker

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I guess the only thing we haven't done is look through who the non-Poeltl centers are who are making $8-12M?

I agree that it's the obvious place to upgrade the team, and we know Brad likes to maximize roster quality across the board, so I expect to see a center happen (people forget that he went out and got Theis at $9M last year even when TL and Al were both healthy).
Vucevic would be cost-prohibitive. The only other viable option would be the Hornets Mason Plumlee unless I’m missing someone. Nobody else is consider an upgrade over Kornet.