Screw it ! There's one way to retain our OS dominance...Win 10 is free to anyone running 7 or 8.1, b

InsideTheParker

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Downloaded GWX. It found that I have no Win10 stuff at all so far, but that I didn't have anything to prevent them downloading (I guess my own vigilance has done that so far). Now that I have this gizmo, should I allow automatic updating and discontinue my anti-Win10 vigilance? Because it's really boring!

I am not a person who is sophisticated about computers. I mainly know how to read and type. So, when my husband decides to get a new computer in order to move on from WinXP b/c it is no longer supported, I assume he knows what he is doing. Maybe not, b/c he, too, doesn't spend all that much time on these issues. I find your assurances reassuring, and will stop fretting about it.
 

Couperin47

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If you click the prevent Win 10 upgrade button and turn on the monitor mode you can stop worrying about unintentional 'upgrade'. As time passes you may have to update this app as MS finds new ways to try and sneak it onto machines. If/when you WANT Win 10, it takes just a second to select the buttons that will allow and then uninstall this tiny app.

As to allowing 'auto updating' that is a VERY bad idea in any event because:

1. many/most of the non critical, not security updates are now adding Win 10 type 'telemetry' (snooping and reporting of info back to MS) that's frankly none of their damn business and certainly not in your interest at all.
2. We have updates every few months that cause major & minor screwups to many boxes, no one should do ANY updates until several days after MS releases this stuff to see how the world reacts.
 

attydave

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Windows 10 updated on 2 of my computers this weekend, a desktop and a laptop. Now, the keyboards on both are not working, just a clicking sound as keys are hit. The desktop has a wireless keyboard and the laptop has the built in keyboard.

Anyone else experience this or have a solution?

TIA
 

Carlos Cowart

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Perhaps I should start a new thread for this but I took a contract with MS last summer and bought a shitty HP laptop at Walmart because MS didn't have a loaner, and to use mine meant I would have had to agree to them wiping my HD when the contract finished. So now the contract is up and I have the HP laptop which is now saying my Windows 8.1 (barf) trial is up soon. Tried to update to Windows 10 and they said I'm not eligible. So what's up with that? Walmart sells laptops where the OS goes away in a year unless you buy the upgrade?

If anyone knows a workaround to upgrade to 10 I'd love to hear it, but, failing that, what's the best open source OS that a complete moron can switch to? I have 5 other laptops and will throw this in the fireplace before throwing another nickel to Microsoft.
 

Harry Hooper

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CC, you'll probably get a slew of answers from devotees of various operating systems.

Linux Mint is pretty straightforward to set up. It actually runs OK on a circa 2004 Toshiba laptop I have with 2 GB of RAM installed.
 

Joe Sixpack

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Yeah, Linux Mint is the way to go. My wife had a Dell laptop awhile back where windows decided to stop recognizing the wifi card. Tried everything including a total wipe and fresh install of Windows, no luck.

Finally said fuck it and put on Linux mint and everything worked great. My wife is completely non technical and had no issues with it at all. It's incredibly user friendly and the install process is even easier than Windows at this point.
 

InsideTheParker

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A woman has won $10K judgment from Microsoft. Win10 messed up her computer:
http://www.seattletimes.com/business/microsoft/microsoft-draws-flak-for-pushing-windows-10-on-pc-users/
A few days after Microsoft released Windows 10 to the public last year, Teri Goldstein’s computer started trying to download and install the new operating system.

The update, which she says she didn’t authorize, failed. Instead, the computer she uses to run her Sausalito, Calif., travel-agency business slowed to a crawl. It would crash, she says, and be unusable for days at a time.

“I had never heard of Windows 10,” Goldstein said. “Nobody ever asked me if I wanted to update.”
When outreach to Microsoft’s customer support didn’t fix the issue, Goldstein took the software giant to court, seeking compensation for lost wages and the cost of a new computer.
She won. Last month, Microsoft dropped an appeal and Goldstein collected a $10,000 judgment from the company.

The company denies wrongdoing, and a spokeswoman said Microsoft halted its appeal to avoid the expense of further litigation.
 

The Napkin

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So I finally upgraded last night and am mostly happy. Only one issue (so far?). I use Digssby messenger to chat with friends and family and for some reason when I try to connect I get a long pause and then connection failed. I went to the firewall and added it as an exception but that doesn't seem to do anything. (I have not rebooted since now that I think about it, would that matter?)

Any thoughts on something easy I can try? Failing that, any recommendations for a messenger app that works nicely on Win10? It'd have to work with yahoo and other flavors would be welcome if it did them as well.
 

Couperin47

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So for those of us who are cynical about 10... now that they have you in a pot from which you cannot jump back (only out...as in to Linux) they have begun to fiddle with the burner beneath you...exactly at what point will each of you realize who now controls your computers ? Hint: It ain't you with Win 10:

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/07/29/windows_10_pro_anniversary_update_tweaked_to_stop_users_disabling_cloud_ads/

For those who can't be bothered with the link: MS is removing the ability to turn off or control their 'enhancements' to Win 10 that basically push some ads and 'suggested software' onto your boxes, unless you have an Enterprise version.
 

Nick Kaufman

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So for those of us who are cynical about 10... now that they have you in a pot from which you cannot jump back (only out...as in to Linux) they have begun to fiddle with the burner beneath you...exactly at what point will each of you realize who now controls your computers ? Hint: It ain't you with Win 10:

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/07/29/windows_10_pro_anniversary_update_tweaked_to_stop_users_disabling_cloud_ads/

For those who can't be bothered with the link: MS is removing the ability to turn off or control their 'enhancements' to Win 10 that basically push some ads and 'suggested software' onto your boxes, unless you have an Enterprise version.
Pushing ads on an OS you ve bought is utterly ridiculous.
 

Couperin47

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Pushing ads on an OS you ve bought is utterly ridiculous.
but..it was...free. This is the deal you make with the devil that MS is morphing into...The ads are the least of it, it's the games and crapware that gets pushed and the details of how and when you can erase the stuff that gets installed are not straightforward. It's also only a matter of time til they change or eliminate some feature or interface feature that is part of your own routine and you are stuck having to change the way you work. Slowly but surely from XP to 7 to 8 to 10 they have been removing all but the most trivial ability to customize, you WILL have to learn to work and interact they way THEY want. No thank you...
 

HriniakPosterChild

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now that they have you in a pot from which you cannot jump back (only out...as in to Linux) they have begun to fiddle with the burner beneath you.
Do you have a link for this?

That is, I cannot find anything to support your earlier assertion that if restore an image backup of Win7 over a Win10 upgrade that the Win7 installation will be ineligible for Windows Update. I would love to read more about this. A few months ago, I upgraded the 3 Win7 machines that I care about so that I could get the "digital entitlement". I immediately restored the Win7 snapshots I made before the upgrade. They all seem to be getting Windows 7 Updates just fine.
 

Couperin47

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Do you have a link for this?

That is, I cannot find anything to support your earlier assertion that if restore an image backup of Win7 over a Win10 upgrade that the Win7 installation will be ineligible for Windows Update. I would love to read more about this. A few months ago, I upgraded the 3 Win7 machines that I care about so that I could get the "digital entitlement". I immediately restored the Win7 snapshots I made before the upgrade. They all seem to be getting Windows 7 Updates just fine.
That's because you restored within 30 days. After 30 days MS revises their databases, you then have a digital entitlement to 10, but your prior entitlement to 7 or 8 is PERMANENTLY erased. If you then try to restore 7 or 8 or attempt to revert from 10, you will find it is now and can never again be an authorized copy. They are quite clear about this. Their exact wording these days is your license to 7 or 8 is 'consumed' by your upgrade. After 30 days, your licenses to 7 or 8 cease to exist. Of course there are fairly easy ways to make any copy of 7 or 8 'pass the test' to be authentic enough to get updates, but they are still, then, pirate copies.
 

HriniakPosterChild

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After 30 days MS revises their databases
Do you have a link for that. I'd be interested to read more about that.

See, for comparison, this from Microsoft:

When I upgrade a preinstalled (OEM) or retail version of Windows 7 or Windows 8/8.1 license to Windows 10, does that license remain OEM or become a retail license?

If you upgrade from a OEM or retail version of Windows 7 or Windows 8/8.1 to the free Windows 10 upgrade this summer, the license is consumed into it. Because the free upgrade is derived from the base qualifying license, Windows 10 will carry that licensing too.

Your Windows 7 license will always be valid and will not be changed or deactivated because of the upgrade to Windows 10: you'll be able to install or restore Windows 7 again in case you'll need to do that (provided that you've the Windows 7 installation DVD
(Underlined by me for emphasis.)
 
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Couperin47

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HriniakPosterChild

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Would you be kind enough to cite a quote from that to support your position: After 30 days MS revises their databases, you then have a digital entitlement to 10, but your prior entitlement to 7 or 8 is PERMANENTLY erased.

Because I'm reading from that thread that 1) the Win10 upgrade gets the rights of the version being upgraded, wrt. OEM vs. Retail and full vs. upgrade [and not that the upgrade causes Win7 license to be erased from any Microsoft databases], and 2) people are having problems with things seem to be broken.

The reason for latter could easily be that things were/are broken, not due to Microsoft's changing their policy about Windows 7 licensing.

In the thread you linked to, I did see this from "anotherhaus":

I actually saw this answered elsewhere on the forum by a Microsoft employee though I did not save the link. They said (and this was the only direct answer to this question I found) that your key would work to reinstall the original OS if you desired. In other words, if you upgraded to Windows 10 and later decided to reinstall your old OS with its COA key you would be OK to do so (obviously assuming you did not try to use the same key to run 10 on another machine).
and this:

What I am saying is that if you tried Win10 and hated it, you could go back to the original OS that came with your machine and reinstall it (and activate it) even after you had activated Win10. Activating Win10 does not invalidate your prior license.
I have no idea if the license terms allow you to run both 7 (or 8) and 10 simultaneously, even if by simultaneously we're referring to a dual boot scenario in which only one can be booted at once. I would assume not but I haven't done dual-booting in years so I have no idea.
My chief concern with this thread was simply whether I'd be allowed to go back to my old OS once I tried Windows 10, or would I be forever stuck with Windows 10 once I installed it. I know Microsoft allows 30 days to roll back, but it appears that if you created (or have) recovery media for your old OS you can go back any time if you do a clean install of the old OS.
 

JimBoSox9

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Couperin47

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The situation is, apparently far more complicated: It seems to depend in part on what you're upgrading to 10 from: Examples: an OEM version of 7 or 8 or 8.1 which has a key, any of these which was, itself, upgraded from XP or Vista (which means older keys), a full retail version of 7 or 8 or 8.1, a preauthorized version of one of these which means you never had an actual product key. Basically after 30 days the backup copy when you upgraded to 10 is removed so a revert to what you had before is impossible using their utility (which isn't working all that well). Much better results using the MS imaging utility to back up your boot drive or any other full image software (like Acronis, Macrium Reflect, etc). Without these you either need your original OS discs (which very few have) or obtain and burn MS ISO images of your old OS, then you can try using your old product key. Many are reporting their keys are now bound to 10 and won't work. Of course if it still does work you're reverting to an original copy of the old OS, no updates, no software installed, which means a huge chore to get the OS patched to current status and reinstall all software and customizations. If it works, anyone contemplating this should really have their old OS imaged. Those whose 7 or 8 were themselves upgraded from something earlier are having massive issues, those trying to restore to 8.1 are often seeing they can only revert to 8 and then have to upgrade from that again. Some with images of preauthorized versions (no product key) have apparently been able to revert, without such an image those without an old product key have no way to reinstall unless they have the original media as the MS ISO you can download requires a product key. Reversion to Pro or Ultimate versions of 7 or 8 seem to work sometimes, far less success with the basic Home versions. So, perhaps you can revert: best to make a complete image of your boot drive, make sure you have your product key and hope for the best. The contradictory info and reports out there are immense and MS remains utterly silent as to clarification.
 

JimBoSox9

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The situation is, apparently far more complicated: It seems to depend in part on what you're upgrading to 10 from: an OEM version of 7 or 8 or 8.1 which has a key, any of these which was, itself, upgraded from XP or Vista (which means older keys), a full retail version of 7 or 8 or 8.1, a preauthorized version of one of these which means you never had an actual product key.

Basically after 30 days the backup copy when you upgraded to 10 is removed so a revert to what you had before is impossible using their utility (which isn't working all that well). Much better results using the MS imaging utility to back up your boot drive or any other full image software (like Acronis, Macrium Reflect, etc). Without these you either need your original OS discs (which very few have) or obtain and burn MS ISO images of your old OS, then you can try using your old product key.

Many are reporting their keys are now bound to 10 and won't work. Of course if it still does work you're reverting to an original copy of the old OS, no updates, no software installed, which means a huge chore to get the OS patched to current status and reinstall all software and customizations. If it works, anyone contemplating this should really have their old OS imaged.

Those whose 7 or 8 were themselves upgraded from something earlier are having massive issues, those trying to restore to 8.1 are often seeing they can only revert to 8 and then have to upgrade from that again. Some with images of preauthorized versions (no product key) have apparently been able to revert, without such an image those without an old product key have no way to reinstall unless they have the original media as the MS ISO you can download requires a product key.

Reversion to Pro or Ultimate versions of 7 or 8 seem to work sometimes, far less success with the basic Home versions. So, perhaps you can revert: best to make a complete image of your boot drive, make sure you have your product key and hope for the best. The contradictory info and reports out there are immense and MS remains utterly silent as to clarification.
FTFY
 

HriniakPosterChild

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"Surprise! Surprise! Surprise!" -- Gomer Pyle

The Get Windows 10 (GWX) promotions seem to have ended. But I've heard from several Windows users that they've been able to take advantage of the free Windows 10 update using their older Windows 7/8.X product keys after July 29. Users have been able to both kick off and activate Windows 10 on machines where they've previously installed Windows 10, as well as on machines where they've never installed Windows 10 using their Windows 7/8.X product keys.
***
My guess is it just might take Microsoft some time to phase out availability of the free Windows 10 bits, the same way company officials said it likely would take some time for them to phase out the Get Windows 10 app and prompts. Or maybe Microsoft execs decided to make the phase out more gradual than they said publicly in case there was a big backlash (in spite of the many notices and prompts alerting users of the pending end of the free update offer.)

All I can say is it would have been helpful for Microsoft officials to acknowledge there was some leeway as to the end of the free upgrade -- especially given there were a number of individuals who couldn't get Windows 10 to update in spite of numerous attempts.

Bottom line: We don't know when Microsoft will finally and completely shut off the free Windows 10 updates for Windows 7 and 8.X users. But if you still don't have Windows 10 and want it, I'd say you should hurry.
 

Couperin47

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Couperin47

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I am really confused by the recent Win7 update(s), which is being called "patchapolyse." (http://www.infoworld.com/article/3130076/microsoft-windows/win-781-patchocalypse-springs-a-few-surprises.html). I have no clue about the safety or adviseability of installing the Safety and Security roll-ups or most of the other updates. I am pretty sure I don't want 2664, but otherwise? Any advice here?
Deliberate obfuscation making it virtually impossible to avoid the many 'updates' that are not really security at all but extension of the Win 10 tracking and crap to 7 and 8.1. Continuing reporting on the situation and strategies to avoid this stuff best summarized here:
https://www.askwoody.com/